NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- Starting at 8 a.m. PST on Tuesday, Apple (AAPL) users can download iOS 8.4, but this update is not about bug fixes -- it is all about Apple Music.

Apple announced at its developer's conference earlier in June that it would begin its own three-part music streaming service. Now three weeks, later the updated music app is ready to launch, with radio streaming set to begin at 9 a.m. PST.

The announcement came in a blog post by Apple Music's senior director Ian Rogers, who was CEO of Beats Music before Apple acquired the company in 2014.

After musing on the birth of digital music, Rogers said that the June announcement of Apple Music made it "hard not to feel like the last 20 plus years was leading to this day." Rogers then linked to a Facebook event that details how users can update to the newest software.

Rogers was not the only Apple executive to let details slip about Apple Music over the weekend. Eddy Cue, the company's senior vice president, took to Twitter to speak with users about the updated app.

As part of his Twitter exchange, Cue explained how Apple Music subscribers would not need to keep an existing iTunes Match account to have information generated about albums or songs not bought through the iTunes store. 

Cue also announced news about the number of songs Apple Music will be able to match throughout the year.

In response to another question, Cue said the Beats app will also update so it can work with Apple Music.


Any developer running the private beta of iOS 9 will not be left out of tomorrow's Apple Music launch, according to Cue.

Apple Music is divided into three sections: Apple Music, Apple Music Radio and Apple Music Connect. Apple Music will offer users access to an entire catalog of more than 30 million songs, while Apple Music Radio will include a 24-hour radio station called Beats 1, which the company said will be dedicated to "music and music culture." It will feature prominent DJs Zane Lowe, Ebro Darden and Julie Andenuga.

Apple Music Connect will allow artists to connect directly with fans through the app, and will give fans the opportunity to reply and interact with their favorite performers.

The streaming service will be available in over 100 countries at the time of the launch on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac and PC and will be offered on Android this fall. After a 3-month trial period, users will be charged a monthly fee of $9.99, or $14.99 for a family plan of up to six users.

Apple Music will compete directly against Internet-based radio service Pandora (P) and on-demand streaming platform Spotify.

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