Goldman Sachs Downgraded, Lending Club Gets Friendly with Banks -- Finance Winners and Losers

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Goldman Sachs (GS) and Citigroup (C) were downgraded from buy to hold by Deutsche Bank. Meanwhile small banks are cozying up to Lending Club (LC) to expand their unsecured loans business and a new report shows that although bankers take a lot of heat for their "fat cat" images, the real C-suite money is in tech.


Deutsche Bank is generally bullish on U.S. banks, but the German bank lowered its ratings on Goldman Sachs and Citigroup from buy to hold on Wednesday morning. Both banks have had respectable rallies in recent quarters, but Deutsche Bank analysts led by Matt O'Connor don't expect the stocks to maintain that trajectory.

Shares of Goldman Sachs closed down 1.82% at $214.43 while shares of Citigroup fell 1.27% to $56.66.


Despite speculation that non-bank firms such as Paypal and Venmo will whittle business away from the traditional banking industry, Lending Club has found a way to befriend its older competitors.

The onlined lender has partnered with small, regional banks to provide unsecured consumer loans to clients, according to the Wall Street Journal. Many small banks had to exit that business following pressure from bigger banks. Lending Club's newest partner is Rhode Island-based BankNewport.

"We have to make sure we remain relevant," Sandra Pattie, BankNewport's CEO, told The Wall Street Journal. "We've been trying for years, six years or so, to get away from our strong reliance on the residential mortgage market. This seemed like it does that for us."

Shares of Lending Club dropped 1.75% to $16.26.


The Wall Street Journal, alongside The Hay Group and Factset, just released its eighth annual ranking of CEOs by compensation and shareholder returns.

Despite what you hear about Wall Street excesses, you will not find a bank CEO among the Top 10 most highly compensated CEOs. In fact, banker compensation barely breaks the top 25: JPMorgan Chase (JPM) CEO Jamie Dimon takes the 24th spot with an annual compensation of $27.7 million. 

The top earning CEOs are found in tech, with Michael Fries of Liberty Global (LBTYA) earning $111.2 million in 2014 and Satya Nadella of Microsoft (MSFT) earning $84.3 million.

Shares of JPMorgan slid 1.05% to $69.02.

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