Goldman Sachs Banker-Turned-Author Resurfaces; Harvey Keitel Angry at E*Trade: Finance Winners & Losers

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Three years after resigning from Goldman Sachs (GS) via the New York Times op-ed page, Greg Smith has a new venture. Actor Harvey Keitel is none too pleased with E*Trade (ETFC) and Uber is looking to get a $2 billion credit line. 


In 2012, Greg Smith penned a New York Times op-ed that stated why he was resigning from Goldman Sachs after spending the entirety of his 12-year career there. It was a juicy read that seemed to confirm many people's suspicions about what happens behind the doors of a top-tier investment bank: Among other things, managing directors supposedly called their clients "muppets."

After a tell-all book, Why I Left Goldman Sachs, failed to deliver the dirty deeds readers were hoping for, Smith seemed to disappear. But America and Wall Street -- the two aren't the same -- both love a comeback, and Smith is making one.

The banker-turned-writer will be assuming the role of president at Blooom, an Overland Park, Kansas-based firm that helps investors manage their 401(k) accounts, according to Fortune. The business model appears to apply robo-adviser-like technology to help clients figure out how to allocate their 401(k) plans with the limited investment options their employers provide. 

"A lot of what Wall Street does is to get people to trade things back and forth just to generate fees," Smith told Fortune. "We're not just trying to get people to trade more stocks with a fancy app. This is about helping people better their lives." 


Harvey Keitel has a problem with E*Trade, and if he's anything like his Pulp Fiction character, Winston Wolf, he'll get it solved. Keitel is suing the online brokerage for backing out of a $1.5 million commercial deal with him and offering only a $150,000 kill fee, according to Bloomberg.

E*Trade used another popular screen villain, House of Cards' Kevin Spacey, in its ads.

Shares of E*Trade closed up 1.1% at $30.98.


Uber, the popular car-booking company that has made enemies of traditional taxi operators, is looking for a $2 billion credit line, according to Bloomberg. In negotiations so far, Morgan Stanley (MS) is leading the deal, while Bank of America (BAC), Barclays (BCS), Citigroup (C), Deutsche Bank (DB), Goldman Sachs (GS), HSBC Holdings (HSBC), JPMorgan Chase (JPM), and SunTrust (STI) are said to be involved as well.

The credit line has sparked speculation that Uber is readying for an IPO, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Shares of Morgan Stanley closed up 1.2% to $39.85.

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