NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Stock futures eased back on Thursday from a rally in equities a day earlier after jobless claims hit a five-week high and as macro concerns over Greece's future in the eurozone worried Wall Street.

S&P 500 futures were down 0.21%, Dow Jones Industrial Average futures fell 0.31%, and Nasdaq futures slipped 0.14%.

Benchmark indexes recorded their biggest gains in two weeks on Wednesday, snapping back from a selloff on Tuesday. The Nasdaq notched a new record high as technology stocks rallied. Click here for more.

Jobless claims climbed to a five-week high, adding 7,000 to 282,000. Economists had expected the number of people filing new claims for unemployment benefits to fall to 270,000 from a revised 275,000 the week earlier. The measure was closely watched ahead of the May jobs report to be released on Friday, June 5. 

"The trend in claims, below the pre-recession trough for weeks now, remains in line with our forecast for continued tightening in labor market slack ahead and with our expectation for another solid payrolls report next Friday," said BNP Paribas' Derek Lindsey. 

Hopes for a Greece debt deal were extinguished as European officials denied an agreement was being drafted. Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had told reporters on Wednesday that a deal was close at hand, but Valdis Dombrovskis, a European Commission vice president, refuted that, noting the two sides had a long way to go. 

With negotiations still taking place, it is looking less likely Greece will be able to make a June 5 repayment to the International Monetary Fund. Germany's DAX and France's CAC 40 were trading modestly lower, while the Athens Stock Exchange General Index fell 0.81% on Thursday. 

"Markets will look for inspiration from abroad, with mixed Greek headlines continuing to leave investors somewhat uneasy as a key June 5 payment date approaches," said Gennadiy Goldberg, U.S. strategist for TD Securities. "We believe next week's payrolls, ISM, PCE, and trade data will help offer further clarity on whether [domestic] economic momentum has turned a corner."

Avago Technologies (AVGO) confirmed it was buying chipmaker Broadcom (BRCM) in a  cash-and-stock deal worth $37 billion. Avago expects the acquisition to generate $750 million in annual cost synergies within 18 months of closing. Avago shares were up 2.7% in premarket trading after a 7.8% jump on reports of a deal on Wednesday. Broadcom shares fell 0.8%.

Costco (COST) fell more than 1% in premarket trading after missing sales estimates in its third quarter. The company earned $1.17 a share, narrowly beating by a penny, while revenue of $26.1 billion fell short by $530 million. 

Abercrombie & Fitch (ANF) added nearly 6% despite posting a wider-than-expected loss. The teen retailer reported a loss of 53 cents a share, 19 cents wider than expected. Revenue fell 13.7% to $709.42 million, missing estimates.  

Google (GOOGL) shares were on watch as the tech giant begins its I/O conference for app developers on Thursday. Google is expected to showcase a new version of Android, and reports said it could overhaul its mobile payment products. 

Amazon (AMZN) is ramping up its same-day delivery efforts by offering the service for free to Prime members. The service will be available to members living in more than a dozen metropolitan areas. 

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