'Fast Money' Recap: Tesla and Whole Foods Garner Mixed Reviews Post Earnings

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Tesla Motors (TSLA) captured Wall Street's attention Wednesday with its earnings announcement and the CNBC "Fast Money" panel was attentive as well. Whole Foods (WFM) also garnered lively discussion but not to the point of reaching a food fight.

Tesla beat Wall Street's first-quarter estimates when it posted a loss of 36 cents a share on revenue of $1.1 billion. Analysts had been expecting the company to deliver a loss of 50 cents a share on revenue of $1.1 billion.

"I have a negative valuation on the stock but not the company," said Tim Seymour, managing partner of Triogem Asset Management. "I think there's a lot more room on the upside if they can quantify their stationary storage business." Seymour added that Tesla is a company that is all about batteries verses a car company.

Dan Nathan, co-founder of RiskReversal.com, said he remains skeptical of Tesla. He noted the most interesting aspect when it comes to the company is when and whether it will reach the mass market in a couple of years with its vehicles and home battery Powerwall.

Nathan said the company may be considered a buy around $220 a share. Tesla closed down 1.1% at $230.43 during the regular session. In after-hours trading, it rallied 3.6% to $238.74.

Whole Foods, meanwhile, also reported earnings Wednesday but missed revenue expectations. During the second quarter, the retail grocery chain generated $3.65 billion in revenue, compared with the $3.71 billion analysts had been expecting. The company also announced plans to roll out another line of retail grocery stores that would offer its food at a lower cost.

The company needs to lower its prices, stressed Seymour, noting it has yet to make headway in this area. Nathan also was sour on the company, describing its management of giving a lot of reasons for its miss in the quarter.

But Karen Finerman, president of Metropolitan Capital Advisors, is long on Whole Foods and says the company has a "management team who knows how to navigate (the challenges it faces)."

On the Drops & Pops segment, Nathan said he would not touch Noodles & Co. (NDLS) because, in part, of the tons of competition it faces. Seymour is neutral on Anheuser-Busch (BUD), noting the industry is undergoing consolidation. Meanwhile, Pete Najarian, co-founder of optionMonster.com, believes Western Union (WU) could go higher. "It has a great yield and is not trading at extreme valuations," said Najarian.

For the final trades, Seymour is a buyer of iShares China Large-Cap (FXI), Nathan says Twitter (TWTR) is a buy, Finerman says Mylan (MYL) is a buy and Najarian said at $42 he would nibble at Whole Foods and is a buyer.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.

More from Jim Cramer

Inside Carnival's Mind Blowing New Horizon Cruise Ship (Video)

Inside Carnival's Mind Blowing New Horizon Cruise Ship (Video)

Finding Stocks Right for You: Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap (Friday 8/25/18)

Finding Stocks Right for You: Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap (Friday 8/25/18)

Jim Cramer: The 10-Year Yield Could Go to 2.75%

Jim Cramer: The 10-Year Yield Could Go to 2.75%

Replay: Jim Cramer on the Markets, 10-Year Yield, Oil Prices and Foot Locker

Replay: Jim Cramer on the Markets, 10-Year Yield, Oil Prices and Foot Locker

Video: You Could Live in a Ritz-Carlton or St. Regis Home

Video: You Could Live in a Ritz-Carlton or St. Regis Home