7 things your kids should know when they take a car to college

In their song, "Wide Open Spaces," the Dixie Chicks sing about a Dad yelling, "Check the oil!" as he drops his daughter off at college. This is good advice. Here are seven more tips from auto experts for students taking their cars to college:

1. Keep your car in good repair - "Many students have a long ride from their hometown to their college campus so they need to make sure that their vehicle is up-to-date on oil changes and other required maintenance so as to avoid breaking down before they even arrive at college," says William Van Tassel, manager of driver training programs at AAA National. "Having a back-up plan such as a AAA membership which includes roadside assistance also helps."

2. Let your insurer know that you're taking the car to college - Location is one factor used in determining rates, so insurers need to know where the car is used and garaged. If you're on your parents' policy and take their car to campus, you need to notify the insurer of the change of address. The same is true if you own the car and have your own coverage. Your rates may go up or down, depending on the location of your school. If you fail to let the car insurance company know about the location change, you run the risk of a denied insurance claim.

3. Know what to do after an accident - After an accident, first check to see if anyone is injured, says Penny Gusner, consumer analyst for Insure.com. "Then exchange information with the other party -- including name, phone number and insurance information. Take pictures of the scene and take down notes for yourself, even if you have to use your smartphone. This is important because you may forget details later and it will be more difficult to accurately remember what happened even a day later," she says.

You should also call the police to get an accident report. If the other person is at fault this is especially important because the driver might admit fault at the scene but say differently later. "If it's on the police report, it's harder for the person to change their story," says Gusner. If the police can't or won't respond, see about filing your own report with them after the fact. In some state it's required that you file a crash report with the state if police don't respond.

Call your own insurance company and if you think the other driver's at fault, contact his insurer as well.