Ranked: The 10 States in America With the Laziest Adults

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Obesity is a major problem in the U.S. for both our health and our wallets. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports more than one-third, or 78.6 million, American adults are obese. This problem leads to medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain forms of cancer, all of which are leading causes of preventable death.

Furthermore, obesity weighs down our wallets. The CDC states the estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 U.S. dollars. Obese people also incur $1,429 more in medical costs, on average, than those of normal weight.

One of the primary factors in obesity is the lack of physical activity. After all, it's hard to lose any weight without at least some exercise. And this laziness is more prevalent in some U.S. states than others.

The CDC issued a report entitled "2014 State Indicator Report on Physical Activity," that lists data across multiple fitness categories for adults for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The CDC recorded the percentages of those who reported no leisure-time physical activity, those who met 150-minute-per-week and 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guidelines, those who met a muscle-strengthening guideline, those who met both the 150-minute and muscle strengthening guidelines, and those who usually walk or bike to work.

Given this data, we can determine which are the 10 laziest U.S. states based on which states reported the greatest lack of leisure-time physical activity. So let's start the countdown and find out which states need to get moving. For good measure, we've included some extra obesity data from 2012 from "F as in Fat," a project of the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

For comparison, here are the national averages for each of the six CDC categories:

No leisure-time physical activity: 25.4%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 51.6%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 31.8%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 29.3%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 20.6%

Usually walked or biked to work: 3.4%

10th Laziest: Missouri

The Show-Me State has the 17th-highest adult obesity rate in the country at 29.6%, including 13.5% of children ages 10 to 17.

No leisure-time physical activity: 28.4%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 49.5%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 30.5%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 24.7%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 17.3%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2.2%

9th Laziest: Indiana

Indiana ranks eighth in the U.S. with a 31.4% adult obesity rate and is 10th among high school students at 14.7%.

No leisure-time physical activity: 29.2%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 46%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 27.5%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 26%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 17.3%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2.6%

8th Laziest: Kentucky

Kentucky owns some eye-popping numbers with regard to obesity. The Bluegrass State ranks in the top 10 for obesity in adults (31.3%, ninth), high school students (16.5%, third), children ages 10-17 (19.7%, eighth) and low income 2-4s (15.5%, sixth).

No leisure-time physical activity: 29.3%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 46.8%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 29.3%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 26.3%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 17.3%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2.3%

7th Laziest: Arkansas

Arkansas is the third-most obese state in the U.S. with a staggering 34.5% obesity rate among adults, 34.1% for men and 35.1% for women.

No leisure-time physical activity: 30.9%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 45.7%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 27.8%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 24.7%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 16.7%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2%

6th Laziest: Oklahoma

Oklahoma holds the second-highest obesity rate for high school students among U.S. states at 16.7%, which ranks only behind Alabama, the next entry on the list.

No leisure-time physical activity: 31.2%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 44.8%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 27.1%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 23.8%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 16.2%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2.1%

5th Laziest: Alabama

Alabama's high school students have the highest obesity rate in the country at 17%. The state ranks fifth among adults at 33%.

No leisure-time physical activity: 32.6%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 42.4%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 23.9%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 24.7%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 15%

Usually walked or biked to work: 1.4%

4th Laziest: Louisiana

Louisiana is the most obese state in the U.S. with a 34.7% rate among adults. It is also fourth among high school students and children ages 10 to 17 at 16.1% and 21.1%, respectively. 

No leisure-time physical activity: 33.8%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 42%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 25.9%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 23.9%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 15.5%

Usually walked or biked to work: 2.4%

Tied for 3rd and 2nd Laziest: Tennessee

Tennessee ranks 10th in the country for adult obesity at 31.1% and fifth among children ages 10 to 17 at 20.5%.

No leisure-time physical activity: 35.1%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 39%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 22.7%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 20.6%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 12.7%

Usually walked or biked to work: 1.5%

Tied for 3rd and 2nd Laziest: West Virginia

West Virginia ranks in the double digits for obesity rates for children and low income residents, but it sits fourth for adults at 33.8%.

No leisure-time physical activity: 35.1%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 43%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 26.1%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 20.2%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 12.7%

Usually walked or biked to work: 3%

The Laziest State In America: Mississippi

Mississippi is the laziest state in the U.S., as 36% of residents reported no leisure-time physical activity to the CDC. The obesity numbers are also rather high, as the Magnolia State ranks first among children ages 10 to 17 at 21.7%, second among adults at 34.6% and fifth among high school students at 15.8%.

No leisure-time physical activity: 36%

Met 150-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 40%

Met 300-minute-per-week aerobic activity guideline: 23.7%

Met muscle-strengthening guideline: 23.9%

Met 150-minute aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening guidelines: 14.2%

Usually walked or biked to work: 1.8%

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Did your state make the list? Are you surprised by the entries? Drop us a line in the comments to let us know.

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