The 10 U.S. States With the Laziest Kids

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- It's no secret that a child born after the Millennial Generation in the U.S. may be more compelled to beat the newest Xbox game rather than run around outside with friends.

According to the State Indicator Report on Physical Activity for 2014 compiled by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, certain states have a higher rate of kids who don't participate in any physical activity on a daily basis. The survey reported 15.2% of young people on a national level do not engage in any physical activity, while 27.1% meet the guideline for aerobic activity, and 29.4% of kids receive a daily dose of physical education.

Some states, however, have been making efforts to improve the lazy state of kids in America. The health departments of Minnesota, Massachusetts and Michigan, for example, are currently working to promote urban design to enhance access to safe places for physical activity, along with focusing on the improvement of physical education and physical activity in a school setting.

Despite that effort, here are the 10 states that most need to get their youth people in motion, based on the percentage of those who reported no physical activity on a daily basis.

10th Laziest: Maryland

Maryland comes in as the 10th laziest state for kids as The Old Line State doesn't have a recess policy, physical activity for preschoolers, or guidance on policies for school districts on walking or biking to or from school, according to the CDC's report.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 18%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 21.6%

Received daily physical education: 18.2%

Tied for 8th and 9th Laziest: Georgia

The non-profit Action for Healthy Kids announced in 2013 that Georgia had plans to add 30 minutes of physical activity to all elementary schools as the state has one of the worst child obesity rates in the country.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 18.7%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 24.7%

Received daily physical education: 33.6%

Tied for 8th and 9th Laziest:  Florida

The Sunshine State has its own non-profit organization in favor of a healthy lifestyle among youth called FLIPANY, or Florida Introduces Physical Activity and Nutrition to Youth. Founded in 2005, the program focuses on providing healthy snacks and nutrition workshops to kids.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 18.7%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 25.3%

Received daily physical education: 24.2%

7th Laziest:  Delaware

College students are looking to make a change in health among youths with a program called the Cooperative Extension. The program will affect 2,500 children ages eight through 12 with 10 hours of nutrition and physical activity by Oct. 31.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 19.1%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 23.7%

Received daily physical education: 13.1%

6th Laziest:  Tennessee

Non-profit organizations such as Action for Healthy Kids, the American Heart Association and Alignment Nashville are encouraging the lazier youngsters in Tennessee by providing active lifestyle programs to improve health and prevent pediatric obesity.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 19.6%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 25.4%

Received daily physical education: 22.3%

Tied for 4th & 5th Laziest: Kentucky

In February, the Kentucky Department for Public Health pointed out that nearly 16% of low-income children under the age of five who enrolled in federally-funded maternal and child health programs were characterized as obese. The department is helping numerous early care and education centers improve physical activity standards for young children by promoting targeted health policies and practices, and providing training to the child care and pre-K communities. 

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 19.9%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 22.5%

Received daily physical education: 19.3%

Tied for 4th & 5th Laziest: Arkansas

Arkansas Children's Hospital and the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas earlier this year announced a co-sponsorship of GoNoodle for elementary schools in Arkansas. GoNoodle is a new interactive resource used in classrooms to increase students' physical activity which could help decrease childhood obesity, which is projected to affect 60% of Arkansas residents by 2030.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 19.9%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 27.5%

Received daily physical education: 23%

3rd Laziest: Alabama

The Heart of Dixie is also looking to focus its attention on helping kids become accustomed to physical activity at a young age, according to The Alabama Action Guide, which accompanies the CDC's report. The report asserts Alabama expects to enforce the recess policy in its schools and meet standards for a more intense physical education regimen for kids as young as preschool ages.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 20.2%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 24.8%

Received daily physical education: 35.7%

2nd Laziest: Mississippi

The Office of Population Health filed a 2014 report regarding the Mississippi In-School Physical Activity Policy, which proved from a sample of elementary school students from 11 public schools in the Mississippi Delta, that 47.1% of first through fifth graders were overweight or obese. The report concluded approximately 44% of schools in the Mississippi Delta did not have a recess policy.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 22.8%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 25.9%

Received daily physical education: 28.7%

The Laziest: Washington D.C.

Our nation's capital is making moves to resign from its top spot as the laziest state in terms of physical activity among its youth. Twenty schools were chosen this year across the district to receive grant funding of up to $200,000 a year through the DC Physical Activity for Youth (DC PAY) grant under The Healthy Schools Act of 2010. The funding is intended to offer physical activity to students before, during and after school hours.

Percentage of those who reported no physical activity: 27.7%

Met aerobic activity guideline: 16.4%

Received daily physical education: N/A

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Did your state make the list? Are your surprised by any of the entries? Drop a line in the comments to let us know.

Must Read:  The 10 Drunkest States in the U.S.

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