Philly.com Bets on Internet Gambling

In the eternal tango between regulators and those who wish to avoid regulation, history has shown that rules are made to be broken, and most can be. On the Internet, where a lack of borders complicate any attempts at regulation, loopholes abound. Philly.com is ushering in online gambling through one of those loopholes, hoping to beef up its balance sheet in the process.

The site, which launched a fantasy sports gambling venture on April 7 in partnership with the British betting site FanDuel, is the first to experiment with a new take on fantasy betting. Instead of betting on aggregate results over a whole season, users are invited to place their bets on individual games, with payoffs dispensed as soon as the final whistle blows, buzzer sounds or player leaves the field, depending on the sport.

By including professional baseball, basketball, football and hockey, Philly.com gives players more than 5,000 regular-season opportunities to make money, with dozens of playoff and championship games thrown in to boot.

And there is money to be made. Estimates from the American Gaming Association put earnings going to offshore gambling sites from customers in the U.S. at $5.9 billion in 2008, a number expected to grow as fewer gamblers travel to spots like Las Vegas and Atlantic City to get their fix.

According to the press release, some top fantasy betters bring in $16,000 a month on the site, with winnings for individual games topping out at $90 (for a $50 buy-in). All of this spells survival for Philly.com, a site belonging to the city’s major newspaper, The Philadelphia Inquirer. With media companies across the country experiencing a rapid drop in advertising revenue, Philly.com may have found a viable revenue stream to keep the company alive.

So is it legal? It is, despite the government’s vague rulings on the subject. Internet gambling is illegal in the U.S., but individual states may choose how broadly they interpret that concept. Philly.com’s venture takes advantage of a provision in 2006 legislation that exempts fantasy sports leagues from the restrictions on betting with real money online.

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