Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Boss?

By Sandy Shore, AP Business Writer

DENVER (AP) — Do you have what it takes to be a boss?

Some people are natural managers. They love to lead, drive performance and contribute to the broader goals of a company. The perks also can be enticing — more money and perhaps even an office or expense account.

Yet, management isn't for everyone. It requires a unique set of skills to get the best performance out of all employees and to juggle a number of tasks all at once. Managers also put in longer hours and are held to a higher standard of accountability.

Here are some tips to help you decide if you have what it takes to be a manager.

MANAGER OR MANAGED?

Some workers simply evolve into managers over the course of their careers. Others are bored with their current position and see it as a way to tackle new challenges. In difficult economic times, some are promoted before they're ready, which could put them at a disadvantage.

"It's not just a raise in pay or better title," New York City counseling coach Lynn Berger said. "There's responsibilities and duties, that some people are better suited for than others."

If you're interested in pursuing a management position, you first should decide whether it would be a good fit.

Here are some questions to consider:

  • What do you love about your job? Would you be disappointed if you no longer could do those tasks?
  • Watch what your boss deals with every day. Are those tasks you would like to do? Could you do them better?
  • Are you interested in mentoring others?
  • Are you an effective communicator? Well-organized? Team-oriented? Patient?
  • Are you confident and secure in your abilities and as a person?
  • Can you hold people accountable? Could you discipline or fire a subordinate?

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