Fraud Alert: Haiti Relief Scams

By Dave Carpenter, AP Personal Finance Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Scammers emerge as predictably as earthquake aftershocks following natural disasters, making it imperative for consumers to be wary of unsolicited appeals to aid victims in Haiti.

The FBI and security experts warned on Thursday of the likelihood of scams as requests for donations start pouring in via e-mail, text message, telephone and Twitter.

Their key advice: Look carefully before you give money or personal information, and contribute to a known group.

Evidence of potential fraud already has surfaced.

More than 400 Internet addresses related to Haiti have been registered since Monday's devastating quake, Internet security expert Joel Esler said. The names reference Haiti and words such as "earthquake," ''help," ''aid," ''victims" and "survivors."

Many of the Web addresses will likely prove legitimate and redirect to proven charity sites, said Esler, of the Bethesda, Md.-based SANS Institute's Internet Storm Center, which tracks viruses and other Internet problems. But many more will be bogus and associated with Web sites that host malicious software, spyware or other hazardous content, based on similar flurries of activity after Hurricane Katrina, the Asian tsunami and other disasters.

A lot of these Web sites feature a "donate" button but either the money will never go to the relief fund or they will just harvest your credit card number for use later, Esler said.

Those who want to send money or assistance should contribute to organizations they are familiar with and should be careful not to respond to unsolicited e-mails, according to the FBI.

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