Feds Raid Bacteria-Ridden Hand Sanitizer Plant

U.S. marshals have raided Clarcon Biological Chemistry Laboratory’s production facilities after the company refused to promptly destroy contaminated products and improve the practices that led to contamination in the first place.

A number of Clarcon hand sanitizers and other anti-bacterial products were recalled in June, but the FDA says the current seizure of these items and their ingredients is meant to prevent more contaminated products from entering the market.  The sanitizers and antimicrobial skin products were meant to treat open wounds and prevent infection but actually contained potentially dangerous bacteria. 

While no cases of infection have been reported to the FDA, the bacteria found in the products can cause opportunistic infections of the skin and underlying tissues, possibly requiring surgery and leading to permanent damage to the skin, the Associated Press reports.
The company has produced and distributed more than 800,000 bottles of its products across the country since 2007. Consumers are urged to stop using Clarcon products and throw them away.

Inspection of Clarcon’s facilities showed that that company failed to adhere to the FDA’s good manufacturing practice requirements, leading to the contamination.

For a complete list of recalled Clarcon products, visit FDA.gov.

In June, Onar Bonada, the developer of Clarcon lotions, drank his product in front of ABC 4 News cameras in Roy, Utah to prove its safety.

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