Nearly 70% of U.S. Consumers Want Their Chip-and-PIN Credit Cards

NEW YORK (LowCards.com) -- Consumers in the United States are more than willing to transition to chip-and-PIN cards. In fact, a recent survey indicates the majority of Americans are looking forward to the transition, with higher-security cards that contain a computer chip and require the cardholder to enter a PIN.

According to a survey from Vision Critical, 69% of Americans believe EMV chips will make their purchases more secure, since the cards are hard to duplicate and a thief must know the cardholder's PIN to complete a transaction. Only 5% believe the chips will lessen the security on their cards.

Americans are anxious to use chip-based credit cards, but 64% of respondents are more likely to pay in cash rather than credit cards because of recent credit card breaches. Thirty-eight percent said they prefer the idea of chip-and-PIN over chip-and-signature, but there is still a big question about whether people will be willing to use these cards when they are available.

Also see: Target's 46% Drop in Profits Means America Is Finally About to Meet Chip-and-PIN Credit Cards

The key is to keep people confident in their financial institutions. The survey showed 80% of respondents were confident in the security measures at their banks, and 73% were confident with their credit and debit card issuers.

One in 10 respondents said they have already received an EMV chip card (standing for the principals behind the standard, Europay, MasterCard and Visa), but nearly two-thirds of those surveyed were not sure when they would be getting one. All credit card companies and merchants in America are looking to switch to chip and PIN technology by October 2015.

Bill Hardekopf is chief executive of LowCards.com, which compares and rates more than 1,000 credit cards. He is the co-author of "The Credit Card Guidebook."

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