Walmart CEO Outlines Company’s Future: Being Customer-Driven, Investing In Its People, Leading At The Forefront Of Innovation And Technology

At the company’s Annual Shareholders Meeting, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. President and CEO Doug McMillon reaffirmed Walmart’s mission and outlined new ways the company will serve customers through three core principles.

“First, we will be a customer-driven company. We've always said the customer is our boss and we'll make decisions based on how we can serve them better,” said McMillon. “Second, we will invest in our people. As we change and grow, it will be our associates who will make the difference. Finally, we need to be at the forefront of innovation and technology. We will lead with urgency to get ahead of change.”

Customer-Driven

McMillon said Walmart is picking up the pace of change to serve the customer better. “Customers will increasingly expect and require the best of both worlds. They want the excitement and the immediacy of shopping in a physical store and the freedom to shop whenever, however and wherever they want. They want an experience that seamlessly adapts to their life. Walmart can bring together our stores with new digital commerce capabilities to help customers save money, save time, and have access to what they want and need. Walmart will exceed their expectations,” McMillon said.

McMillon continued, “Our stores, 11,000 and growing, will provide access and convenience. If you need it right here, right now, we've got it. We will run great stores and clubs with great associates. We'll keep adding services and pick-up points to our stores to become even more convenient. We’ll also strive to have collection points wherever our customers want us to be, and we’ve seen the demand for food delivery in places like the U.K., Mexico and China. And of course, we'll keep improving our traditional e-commerce offering of ordering online and shipping to customers' homes.”

McMillon also discussed how Walmart would run better stores today to drive same-store sales. He called for: “Price leadership. Strong in stock. Friendly customer service and compelling merchandise. Items that surprise and delight. Merchandise that is presented aggressively. When we’re at our best, the features in our stores anticipate what our customers want and need,” he said.

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