The Biggest Takeaway From Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- I couldn't sit down and watch the two-hour Apple (AAPL) Worldwide Developer Conference presentation during the workday Monday when everyone was tweeting about it.

But last night, I got to sit down and watch the entire presentation on my Apple TV.

I think there were some great takeaways from the event.

The biggest one: Apple will no longer let any better feature on a competing platform exist without adopting it on iOS.

Up until now, Apple has always had a rock-solid platform with iPhone that attracted many users. For the first few years after the release of Google's (GOOG) Android operating system, Apple users seemed to look down on Android, even though its growth in market share was impressive. It just seemed a little bit half-baked. It wasn't as refined. It was a poor man's version of iOS.

But this has changed in the past few years. First, Apple users seemed to have large-screen envy. Then, they started to notice other ways in which Android was actually ahead of Apple. The keyboard seemed better on Android because it was open to third parties to develop. Google Now also seemed to be ahead of Siri.

Other platforms like WhatsApp (now owned by Facebook (FB)) and Snapchat seemed to add more functionality than iMessage as well.

What was clear in Monday's presentation was that Apple is playing offense again. For a long time, the perception was that Android was ripping off Apple.

Yesterday, Apple showed it's not afraid to rip off other people if they come up with some interesting features that Apple thinks its users would like in their iPhones.

The other guys were bellyaching yesterday. The founder of WhatsApp, Jan Koum, tweeted snarkily that Apple seemed to be "innovating" by copying a lot of WhatsApp features. Excuse me, Jan? That's rich, coming from the guy who completely ripped off BlackBerry Messenger. Your one great "innovation" was going cross-platform with a BBM clone. Congratulations. But don't get so high and mighty, assuming that Apple can't come along and add video share, voice memos and location data to iMessage. This isn't kindergarten anymore, Jan.

As an Apple fan, I liked seeing the aggression displayed yesterday.

Did you see Tim Cook every time he walked out on stage? This guy wasn't strolling up there. Every time, he came out he looked like he was on a mission. He couldn't wait to get up there and talk about what Apple was doing.

There were other takeaways, including that Craig Federighi is a great presenter (with even greater hair), but the other one that really stuck with me was the discussion of security in relation to opening up certain parts of iOS (most notably TouchID) to third parties and developers. Apple took a lot of time to explain just why iOS has been so bullet-proof on security (in contrast to Android, of course) and how Apple can continue to be this strong even as it allows others to access TouchID (and presumably other stuff like Siri down the road).

Apple clearly knows its strengths: the Apple ecosystem, things like family sharing, security, privacy, products that work magically. Monday's news on the software update all played to those strengths.

But Apple also seems aware of its weaknesses: screen size, best-of-breed features, messaging and seamless cloud. Monday's news addressed all of those.

Don't believe anyone who says that because Apple didn't introduce new hardware, its presentation was a disappointment. This was one of the most exciting displays of plumbing I've ever seen.

At the time of publication, the author was long BBRY.

This article represents the opinion of a contributor and not necessarily that of TheStreet or its editorial staff.

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