'Fast Money' Recap: What's Up With Twitter?

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- The S&P 500 closed higher by 0.48%, but Twitter (TWTR) was the main focus after it beat on top and bottom line expectations, but sold off in the after-hours session. 

On CNBC's "Fast Money" TV show, Pete Najarian, co-founder of optionmonster.com and trademonster.com, said Twitter still has too slow of growth for investors. He was not a buyer at current levels. 

Tim Seymour, managing partner of Triogem Asset Management, pointed out how good of a quarter Facebook (FB) reported, while Twitter once again failed to impress investors. He said there is currently no reason to own the latter. 

Brian Kelly, founder of Brian Kelly Capital, said Twitter "is in trouble." If forced to choose between Twitter and Facebook, he was a buyer of the latter. 

Steve Grasso, director of institutional sales at Stuart Frankel, is still long a small position in Twitter. He said the stock is susceptible to a gap higher, since short-sellers cannot borrow anymore shares to sell short. 

Robert Peck, managing director at SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, was a guest on the show. He has a neutral rating on Twitter with a $55 price target. He said Twitter does not have the user growth that the Street has been looking for. He questioned when the company would be able to "become more mass market," like Facebook. 

eBay (EBAY) beat on top and bottom line estimates, but fell in the after-hours after it took a $3 billion tax charge due to repatriating $9 billion from overseas. 

Kelly questioned the company's decision to repatriate foreign funds at such a large tax rate and wondered if eBay is desperate for cash. 

Seymour said eBay should do better in the second half of 2014. He added that PayPal is still an important asset. 

Najarian pointed out that the company's guidance was lower than analysts were expecting, which is at least partly responsible for the after-hours dip in the share price. 

Kelly said he would be a seller of Panera Bread Company (PNRA) when the stock bounces. He added that $150 is a key support level for the stock. 

Grasso called shares of Trulia (TRLA) "buyable" at current levels. 

Seymour said investors who are long Dreamworks Animation (DWA) should stay long due to a favorable valuation. Shares are off 25% year-to-date. 

Najarian said he likes Seagate Technology (STX), as well as SanDisk (SNDK) at current levels. 

Alibaba will reportedly price its IPO with a valuation near $155 billion, Seymour said. He added that a successful IPO could boost the entire technology sector and should value shares of Yahoo! (YHOO) near $45, since it owns a 24% stake in the company. 

He also suggested buying Baidu (BIDU) near $150. 

Kelly said investors should avoid Noodles & Company (NDLS) unless the stock finds support near $35 and closes above $36 on Wednesday. 

Seymour was avoiding NDLS at current levels. 


Amazon (AMZN) was the featured company on the show's "Street Fight" segment. Grasso was the bull, arguing that the company grew revenues 23% and its services business 44% in the most recent quarter. He added that Amazon is "pre-paying" for future growth. 

Najarian disagreed, arguing that investors are on the search for growth, and Amazon is failing to deliver as concerns over profits escalate. He added that the stock looks even more unattractive with increasing competition, rising costs and falling margins. 

Seymour was a buyer of Amazon at $250. 

Lorillard (LO) jumped 4% and was the first stock on the show's "Pops & Drops" segment. Seymour said he is staying long the stock. 

GoGo (GOGO) plunged 29%. Kelly said to avoid the stock. 

MGM Resorts International (MGM) popped 9%. Grasso said the company's "huge" exposure to Macau is fueling its growth. 

Coach (COH) fell 9%. Najarian said he would avoid the stock and opted for shares of Michael Kors (KORS) instead. 

Kurt Abrahamson, CEO of ShareThis, was a guest on the show. He said online sharing via social networks is one of the most important factors that sway consumers' buying decisions. Even more than brand or price, he added. He suggested that Twitter is better for "real-time" marketing, while Facebook is better for reaching massive audiences. 

For their final trade, Kelly was a buyer of the SPDR Gold Trust ETF (GLD) and Grasso was a buyer of Amazon with a $280 stop-loss. Najarian was a buyer of Exxon Mobil (XOM) due to bullish options activity and Seymour was a seller of Apple (AAPL) at current levels, but a buyer near $565.


-- Written by Bret Kenwell in Petoskey, Mich.

Follow @BretKenwell

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Bret Kenwell currently writes, blogs and also contributes to Robert Weinstein's Weekly Options Newsletter.

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