Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Is the Everything Man

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- While investors may be tiring of Amazon's (AMZN) act, CEO Jeff Bezos is going into overdrive.

He wants to be Steve Jobs. He wants to be Warren Buffett. He wants to be Paypal and to turn Amazon into Kroger (KR). 

He wants to make your phone 3-D. He wants to be Citizen Kane.

For starters.

What's most amazing is that Bezos is succeeding with each one of these ambitions, and more. All this after becoming a retailing giant to rival Costco (COST) and a cloud giant to rival Google (GOOG).

Take the Steve Jobs act. The Kindle e-book reader was followed by the Kindle Fire tablet, the Fire TV set-top box was announced in the last month and now he's talking up a phone that could display 3-D images without special glasses.

That's pretty Jobs-ian.

Or take Citizen Kane. They laughed when Bezos paid $250 million for The Washington Post. What he got was not a newspaper, but a national media brand, one that was on the verge of winning a Pulitzer Prize.

So he's now leveraging the national footprint through a deal with "local" papers to piggyback the Post on their paywalls and build an Internet video brand around it. 

Orson Welles' fictional hero could have barely kept up.

While investors have been abandoning Amazon stock in droves over the last month, taking it down more than 20% from its high of more than $400, certain that its best growth days are behind it, Bezos has gone through eight iterations of his drone technology, with the aim of letting urban consumers get up to five pounds of whatever in 15 minutes.

Imagine not having to run to the convenience store, or the grocery store, if you forgot one or two things for that recipe you're planning for this evening. It's the kind of thing that happens to this cook at least twice a week.

So don't spend an hour in the car, let Amazon fly it in, all of which makes a $299 Amazon Fresh subscription (which includes Prime video and regular Amazon deliveries) a bargain. You save money on the gas alone.

Then there's Buffett. Bezos' annual letter to shareholders has become a model for transparency, clarity, and self-congratulatory wit. Every one of the company's initiatives is described here in seven pages: print, TV, audio and game publishing, fresh groceries, quick delivery, even plans to get its payment system onto other sites. And just to prove this is all part of a seamless whole, he tacks his 1997 letter to shareholders at the back.

At its present market cap, Amazon is selling for about two times its sales. Yes, most of its sales are from goods, and retailers usually sell at half their sales, not double.

But consider that Apple (AAPL) is selling for over two-and-one-half times its sales. But their Elvis has left their building. Amazon's is just getting started.

At the time of publication the author owned shares of AMZN, COST, GOOG and AAPL.

This article represents the opinion of a contributor and not necessarily that of TheStreet or its editorial staff.

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