Did Samsung or Apple Get Better Product Placement at the Oscars?

NEW YORK (TheStreet) - Everyone is talking about the selfie photos that Ellen DeGeneres took as she hosted the Oscars. Everyone is also talking about how her first "selfie" apparently using a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 came out blurry.

Then Ellen went backstage, picked up her personal Apple (AAPL) iPhone and took a shot with Channing Tatum (which came out clear) and tweeted it.

Later on in the evening, DeGeneres used the Samsung phone again for a group shot with more than a few A-listers. Bradley Cooper was front and center and taking the actual shot. Unfortunately he cut off part of Jared Leto's head, but that's okay. It's still a great shot of "Brangelina," Jennifer Lawrence, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Meryl Streep and newbie Lupita Nyong'o and others.

So which smartphone device maker got the better product placement?

Samsung spent millions in marketing dollars for last night's awards show including air time, a "massive video wall composed of 86 televisions, smartphones, and tablets showing footage from the movies nominated," according to The Verge citing Architectural Digest and one strategically placed Galaxy Note 3 smartphone.

But did Apple have the last laugh?

--Written by Laurie Kulikowski in New York.

Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors, reporters and analysts from holding positions in any individual stocks.

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