Apple Shouldn't Buy Tesla, but (Blank) Should!

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- All this talk swirling around regarding Apple (AAPL) buying Tesla Motors (TSLA) is simply absurd. 

Get real, people! Just because Tesla's CEO Elon Musk met with a banker from Apple some time in the last twelve months means nothing. I met Jim Cramer, but it doesn't mean we're opening a hedge fund together. 

Get my point?

And besides, has anyone even taken fifteen seconds to analyze Apple's past acquisitions? It consists of $50 million here and $100 million there for a few relatively unknown tech startups. You think it's just going to hunt down Tesla -- perhaps one of the most hyped companies in the past year -- and shell out $40 billion or more? 

Good grief!

But...there is one company that can both afford to acquire Tesla and have it make sense: Google (GOOG). 

Back in November, I wrote "Google Should Buy Tesla". The high-tech automaker was in what turned out to be a temporary down trend. But just as everyone thought the story was over, the stock raced back to new highs after the earnings report on Wednesday, Feb. 19. 

Maybe you've heard, or maybe you haven't, but autonomous driving -- driverless driving -- is inching ever closer to becoming a reality. What seemed like a futuristic dream is suddenly becoming a realistic journey in the not-so-distant future. Notably, one of the leaders in the autonomous driving world is Google. 

However, consider the competition in autonomous driving: General Motors (GM), Mercedes-Benz, Audi and BMW, just to name a few. 

Can you spot the missing piece? 

These are all automobile manufacturers. Sure, Google could license its technology for a fully or mostly autonomous vehicle. That's certainly one way to go. 

But what if Google cut out the automakers and went directly to the consumer?

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