Google Revolutionizes the Modern Desktop, With VMware's Help

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- If you thought that Google (GOOG) was done innovating, and VMware (VMW) was just about cloud computing, think again. The Chromebook is trying to revolutionize the modern business world.

Google and VMware today announced that the two companies are going to "modernize corporate desktops for the Mobile Cloud Era," giving businesses secure cloud access to Microsoft (MSFT) Windows applications, data and desktops on Google's Chromebooks.

Not only does this deal expand the presence of Google Chromebooks in the enterprise, it allows businesses to cut costs as well. "Google Chromebooks can save businesses about $5,000 per computer when compared to traditional PCs," said Amit Singh, President of Google Enterprise in the press release. "Chromebooks are designed for the way people use computers today and are a secure, easy and cost-effective solution to help organizations embrace a new way of doing business. Through our partnership with VMware, businesses can now capitalize on these advantages with access to legacy applications, data and desktops they need to keep employees productive."

The services are initially available as an on-premise service, but will eventually become a fully managed subscription offering for the Desktop-as-a-service (DaaS) that VMware and its other partners have provided before. Users can access the Windows applications they have using VMware's Blast HTML5 technology, which is a Web-based app on Chromebooks.

This is an interesting move by Google and VMware, given that PC sales continue to decline, while sales of ultramobile devices, including tablets and smartphones continue to surge.

Research firm Gartner believes PC shipments are forecast to decline 15% this year from 2012 levels, while sales of mobile devices are set to jump 407% in the same time period. Clearly, Google is thinking that the Chromebook is an "ultramobile device," despite it being no different than a regular laptop, which could or could not be considered a mobile device, depending on the person or the context.

--Written by Chris Ciaccia in New York

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