Filter This Out If You Love Apple and Like Losing Money

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Some of the comments I received to Thursday's Does Your Apple Store Smell Like Body Odor? were simultaneously troubling and telling.

They illustrate the psychological filtering that costs traders and investors money in the stock market. In fact, there's no better illustration of this than Apple (AAPL), the ultimate emotion-driven battleground stock.

Although they represent a tiny fraction (way less than 1%) of total readership, I don't completely discount article comments because, while sometimes disturbing, they're often telling.

Go read them. Scroll to the bottom and watch grown men and women portray themselves as buffoons.

Something I wrote last summer -- in an article that, suddenly, proves prescient -- applies to the present dustup:

... most people who complain about outrageous headlines don't actually have a problem with the outrageous headline. They just use the spectacle of the headline to project annoyance with an argument their psychological filters keep them from considering.

But the "body odor" article takes it a step farther.

A handful of intellectually handicapped souls can't get past the discussion of body odor in a public forum. They don't expect to see it on a financial media Website so they're immediately offended.

If it's not a case of outrage or, in some instances the giggles, that got them, it's just that the article was written about Apple. Had I used the notion of a stinky retail store as a springboard to trash Microsoft (MSFT), it would have been all good. Fist pumps and chest bumps all around.

To set the record straight ... I published the story because Apple Store employees in Santa Monica confirmed the stench indeed exists and is a problem. One they're aware of and would like to see fixed.

Who wouldn't?

If you don't think the story applies to AAPL as an investment, you're not proceeding critically or with caution.

To reiterate a few points ...

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