Iran will also refrain from commissioning its under-construction 40 megawatt heavy water reactor in Arak, central Iran. That reactor can produce plutonium, another route to building a warhead.

Under the deal, the number of IAEA inspectors in Iran will "roughly double," said Tero Varjoranta, an agency deputy director general. That would increase the agency's presence on the ground to a maximum of eight inspectors in Iran at any time.

IAEA inspectors will have daily access to Iran's enrichment facilities, a senior diplomat familiar with details of the implementation plan said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss details.

In exchange for the nuclear curbs, Iran receives a halt to new sanctions and easing of some existing sanctions. Measures targeting petrochemical products, gold and other precious metals, the auto industry, passenger plane parts and services will be lifted immediately.

The Geneva deal allows Iran to continue exporting crude oil in its current level, which is reported to be about 1 million barrels a day.

Senior U.S. administration officials have put the total relief figure at some $7 billion of an estimated $100 billion in Iranian assets in foreign banks. Iran is to receive the first $550 million installment of $4.2 billion of its assets blocked overseas on Feb. 1.

Iran's hard-liners have called the deal a "poisoned chalice", highlighting the difficult task President Hasan Rouhani faces in selling the accord to skeptics.

Hard-line media denounced the bargain. The Vatan-e-Emrooz daily printed in black Monday instead of its usual colors, a sign of sorrow and mourning. It declared the deal a "nuclear holocaust" and called it a gift to Israel's Prime Minister Benyamin Netanyahu.

"Today, Netanyahu is the happiest person in the world," it said.

However, the Israeli prime minister has made the opposite argument: He says the deal gives Iran too much for too few concessions.

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