What Information Are We Willing To Share To Improve Healthcare? (Graphic: Business Wire)

Most people are optimistic about technology innovations advancing healthcare, are willing to participate in virtual healthcare visits with their doctor, and would use health sensors in their bodies and even their toilets, according to a new study commissioned by Intel Corporation.

The “Intel Healthcare Innovation Barometer,” conducted across eight countries by Penn Schoen Berland, found the majority of people also believe that technology innovation holds the best promise for curing fatal diseases – more than increasing the number of physicians or additional funding for research.

“This survey indicates very high willingness of people to become part of the solution to the world’s healthcare problems with the aid of all sorts of technologies,” said Eric Dishman, Intel fellow and general manager of the company’s Health and Life Sciences Group. “Most people appear to embrace a future of healthcare that allows them to get care outside hospital walls, lets them anonymously share their information for better outcomes, and personalizes care all the way down to an individual’s specific genetic makeup.”

Intel’s research revealed that what people want most at the intersection of healthcare and technology is more personalized care based on their own behaviors and biology that provides the freedom to get healthcare wherever and whenever it’s convenient for them.

Personalization: Putting the “Me” into Medicine

More than 70 percent of respondents are receptive to using toilet sensors, prescription bottle sensors or swallowed monitors to collect ongoing and actionable personal health data. Sixty-six percent of people prefer a personalized healthcare regimen designed specifically for them based on their genetic profile or biology. And 53 percent of those surveyed said they would trust a test they personally administered as much or more than if it came from a doctor.

“Technologies such as high-performance computing and big data analytics have the power to change the face of health in this world, and most people seem to desire that,” Dishman said. “When given a choice between getting the same care as others who have their symptoms or getting care based on their own genetic profile, two in three respondents choose customized care.”

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