BC-Business News Digest

Business News at 5:30 p.m.

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New this digest:

--Adds: ON THE MONEY-MILLENNIALS AND RETIREMENT; CRASH TEST-TESLA ADVERTISING; WOMEN ON BOARDS;FED MINUTES; TRIBUNE JOB CUTS

--Updates: WALL STREET; RETAIL SALES; AUTO SHOW-HOT CARS; EARNS-JCPENNEY; OIL PRICES; HYDROGEN CARS

TOP STORIES:

HYDROGEN CARS

DETROIT a¿¿ Cars that run on hydrogen and exhaust only water vapor are emerging to challenge electric vehicles as the transportation of the future. At auto shows on two continents Wednesday, three automakers were unveiling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles that will be offered to everyday buyers. Korea's Hyundai be first to market in the U.S. with a fuel-cell SUV for lease next spring. Toyota and Honda will follow in 2015. The cars are appealing because unlike electric vehicles, they have the range of a typical gasoline car and can be refueled quickly. The industry also has overcome safety and reliability concerns about hydrogen that have hindered distribution in the past. But there's still one glaring downside a¿¿ a lack of refueling stations. By Tom Krisher and Yuri Kageyama. SENT: 470 words, photo. UPCOMING: 800 by 8 p.m., photos.

NSA TAPS TECH

SAN JOSE, Calif. a¿¿Back when Yahoo was something hollered at a rodeo and no one could conceive of Googling anything, President Ronald Reagan signed an executive order that extended the power of U.S. intelligence agencies overseas, allowing broader surveillance of non-U.S. suspects. At the time, no one imagined he was giving U.S. intelligence agencies authority to spy on what became known as Silicon Valley. But recent reports that the National Security Agency has secretly broken into overseas networks belonging to Yahoo and Google have technology companies, privacy advocates and even national security proponents calling for a re-examination of Reagan's order and other intelligence laws. By Martha Mendoza. SENT: 1,400 words, photos.

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