Skelton said the mobile facilities are cleaner than slaughtering done in the open at farms.

"I've been to some of those places and I don't think I'd want to feed my dog some of that stuff," he said.

Bruce Dunlop, the president of Lopez Island Farm in Washington state, first used a mobile slaughterhouse in 2001. He uses it to slaughter his cows, goat, sheep and pigs and sells models to other farmers. People who might object to having a permanent slaughterhouse in their neighborhood are less likely to object to mobile processing.

"There's very minimal impact for the neighbors next door," Dunlop said. "They're fine with that."

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