Nancy Collamer, author of "Second Act Careers," says that a new job title -- entrepreneurial support services -- can offer another position within the world of consulting. In this post, workers help entrepreneurs launch their businesses by providing expertise on things such as bookkeeping, business writing, marketing, web development or selling.

2. Non-profit fundraiser

Average salary: $55,220

Suitable for: Someone with extensive writing, speaking, selling or marketing experience in any industry, and especially those who are passionate about a cause

Where the jobs are: Non-profit organizations, universities, religious institutions and government agencies

In addition to a competitive salary, working at a non-profit can also help workers support a cause they care about. This may be an attractive feature for many older workers today, says Marci Alboher, vice president of Encore.org and author of The Encore Career Handbook.

"Baby boomers are also very concerned with doing good and finding meaning in how they spend time working," Alboher says.

To gauge the opportunities in your area, find a nearby non-profit organization that you're interested in and offer your business or industry skills for fundraising and development. If you have extensive management experience, non-profits are often looking for interim directors and managers, according to the "Encore Hot List" of job titles in Alboher's book. The earning potential may not be as high as in the corporate world, but the work may be critical to a cause you care about.

3. Patient navigator/advocate

Average salary: $44,000 (Note: Because the Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't yet track salaries for patient advocates, this data comes from the job-listings site SimplyHired.com.)

Suitable for: Someone with good organizational skills or a background in social work or medicine who wants a helping, non-medical health care role

Where the jobs are: Hospitals, health care facilities and insurance companies

Career experts and statistics agree: The health care industry is growing and it's unlikely to stop soon. With all the changes within the Affordable Care Act, patients and families, especially those fighting chronic illnesses, are likely to need help managing their hospital services, and that's where patient advocates come in. These positions may include working with seniors specifically, if that is your interest, or simply with anyone who requires help with critical health care decisions.