Re-Tweet This Article If You Want to Stop Twitter From Going Public

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Since Twitter announced it would go public, I have had three people ask me, a total of five or six times, when I planned to publish thoughts on the forthcoming IPO. For a no-name hack such as myself, that's quite a bit of interest, not to mention pressure. Consider it the equivalent -- looking relatively at scale -- of like 300,000 of Jim Cramer's viewers querying as to when he will comment on something.

When something dominates the headlines like the Twitter IPO, I sometimes like to wait for the dust to settle before I publish an article. My hope is to (a) not get lost in the rush of the crowd and (b) after having had time to think, come up with a unique take. Given the drivel spewing on this IPO, I'm not sure (b) is possible. #whatevs.

First, I'm tired of the Facebook ( FB) comparisons. That's the easy way to look at this thing.

From a pure IPO standpoint, Twitter will not go down like FB's farcical debut. It's not that the exchanges and underwriters have somehow become competent, it's just that Twitter, from the standpoint of the masses, is a pimple on Facebook's behind. We're not going to have people telling other people to buy TWTR the morning it opens. It will go off like any other major IPO, but without us retail skanks coming in to buy odd or 100-share lots. Fewer orders, less pressure on the system, not as much confusion. Business as usual.

What's most important -- and I have only seen obvious surface scratches of this -- is what happens to Twitter long-term. And, any way you slice it, it's not going to be good, at least not for the world, defined as that vacuum that is the Internet.

I'll get hammered for even thinking this, but, given the potential Twitter has, on so many levels, it should be protected from the toxic outcomes of becoming a public company beholden to investors.

There is no way Twitter can continue to grow as a sociopolitical force around the world and, as an unfiltered source of news and information, as it becomes more commercial. The big televisions networks will, for all intents and purposes, take Twitter over.

Dick Costolo isn't stupid; he's making the easy sale. Lots of people will get rich, advertisers will have another conduit to encourage consumption and, some day soon, we'll all tire of Twitter.

Brands and network television outlets couldn't move fast enough to make social buttons and hashtags a part of every promo, commercial or similar advertising campaign. Now, with second screen viewing and social television all the rage (or the latest fad), there's no question both groups will flock to Twitter, as well as Facebook, because social is perceived as the place to be.

One hand will wash the other. One back will scratch the other.

Television networks will not allow advertisers to simply flee the way traditional radio companies have sat back and helplessly watched Pandora ( P) steal dollars once earmarked for them. They'll make sure they partner with their existing advertisers and Twitter in a such a way that everybody makes money, but Twitter becomes an endless scroll of pitches, advertisements and "calls to action."

A plane lands on the Hudson, an insurance company will be cued up to sponsor the Tweet posted by some random guy on a ferry. I won't even let my imagination run wild; I'll leave that to the sales and marketing hacks across the world who will devise every gimmick in the book to gain access to the millions of people who use Twitter. Of course, they overlook the fact that so many of use Twitter because, at this stage of the company's development, the influence of these hacks and their stunts is, relative to what it will become, minimal.

Once they take over, we're screwed. And, in the long run, so is Twitter. But, what does it matter? Costolo and Jack Dorsey, as much as I love and respect both men (especially the latter), will get richer. The same people who always get rich off of public offerings of stock will get rich. And, depending on how the volatility in TWTR shakes out -- or doesn't -- some retail slugs might make a couple bucks.

When you think about how we treat the arts in this country, it comes as no surprise that we would consider -- inside and outside of the company -- nothing other than letting Twitter continue along as little more than a company squarely focused on making as much money as it can in the shortest amount of time possible after going public.

It's akin to a premier college football program too; Twitter exists as a factory spitting out instant millionaires who will be able to bid up the price of real estate in great cities such as San Francisco.

Of course, we say nothing about the corporate welfare Twitter received from the City and County of San Francisco. That's cool. It just accelerates an economy that continues to benefit a few as it leaves out many.

But the slight inference -- like the one I made a few paragraphs ago, that we should find a way as a society to protect outliers such as Twitter as public goods, as bright spots in a messed-up humanity -- will get shot down as naive, idealistic and impossible. It's intervention the folks TWTR will make fat laugh at simply because it doesn't serve their selfish interests.

Hashtag sigh.

-- Written by Rocco Pendola in New York City

Rocco Pendola is a columnist and TheStreet's Director of Social Media. Pendola makes frequent appearances on national television networks such as CNN and CNBC as well as TheStreet TV. Whenever possible, Pendola uses hockey, Springsteen or Southern California references in his work. He lives in Santa Monica.

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