Business Highlights

By The Associated Press

___

JPMorgan admits fault, pays $920 million in trading loss

WASHINGTON (AP) â¿¿ The financial penalty is staggering. JPMorgan Chase & Co. will pay $920 billion for trading losses that shook the financial world last year.

But the bigger price may be a few words rarely uttered in settlements with U.S. regulators: The nation's largest bank is also admitting wrongdoing.

JPMorgan's acknowledged failure of oversight in the $6 billion trading loss is a first for a major company since the Securities and Exchange Commission reversed its longstanding practice of allowing firms to pay fines without accepting fault.

___

How Fed's latest message affects almost everyone

WASHINGTON (AP) â¿¿ The Federal Reserve's decision to maintain the size of its economic stimulus could be a gift for car and home buyers, for Americans with 401(k) accounts and perhaps for developing economies.

Yet for savers who rely on interest income, Wednesday's announcement was a sour one. The Fed also sent an ominous message to job seekers: Hiring and economic growth remain sluggish and vulnerable to further weakening from budget fights in Washington.

The Fed surprised just about everyone by delaying a slowdown in its $85 billion in monthly bond purchases, which are designed to keep long-term loan rates low to spur borrowing and spending. Fed officials had been signaling since spring that they would likely start reducing their purchases by year's end if the economy steadily improved. Many economists and Wall Street banks had expected that pullback to start this week.

But on Wednesday, Fed officials made clear they aren't yet satisfied with the economy's progress.

___

Here's the truth: The government doesn't shut down

WASHINGTON (AP) â¿¿ Here's the truth about a government "shutdown." The government doesn't shut down.

So the world won't end if a dysfunctional Washington can't find a way to pass a funding bill before the new budget year begins on Oct. 1.

If you liked this article you might like

What's Behind the Surge in Energy Stocks

Hillary Clinton Says Prosecuting Individuals is Key to Wall Street Reform