AP Reviews New Smartphones: Moto X And More

By The Associated Press

New phones are continually coming out. Which should you buy? Here's a summary of The Associated Press' recent phone reviews, including Motorola's new Moto X phone, which is coming out in the U.S. in about a month.

â¿¿ ANDROID DEVICES:

MOTO X, GOOGLE INC.'S MOTOROLA MOBILITY

What's really special about the Moto X has nothing to do with making calls, checking Facebook or holding it in your hands. Rather, it breaks from the pack by allowing for a lot of customization. You can choose everything from the color of the power button to a personalized message on the back cover. To make those special orders possible, Motorola is assembling the Moto X in Texas, making it the first smartphone to be put together in the U.S. The Moto X also offers the ability to get directions, seek trivia answers or set the alarm without ever touching the phone. There's good hardware, too, including a body fits well in the grip of your hands. The Moto X is the first phone designed with Google as Motorola's new owner. It could make Motorola, the inventor of the cellphone, a contender again.

â¿¿ Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer

GALAXY S4, SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO.

The S4 is an excellent device from a hardware standpoint. Its 5-inch screen is larger than its predecessor, yet it's a tad lighter and smaller. The display is sharp, at 441 pixels per inch. Samsung packed the Android device with a slew of custom features, including new camera tools and the ability to perform tasks by waving a finger over a sensor. Many of the features, however, make the phone more complicated to use. In some cases, custom features work only some of the time. In other cases, you're confronted with too many ways to do similar things. The S4 might be for you if you don't mind spending time customizing it. Otherwise, you must bypass all the gimmicks to get to what otherwise is a good phone.

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