GM Beats Estimates on Demand for Trucks; Ahead of the Ticker

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- General Motors ( GM) reported better-than-expected second-quarter profit boosted by demand for pick-up trucks in North America and cost-cutting in Europe.

The automaker said net income fell to $1.2 billion, or 75 cents a share, from $1.5 billion, or 90 cents a share, a year ago. Excluding one-time items, the company earned 84 cents a share, beating analysts' expectations by 9 cents.

Net income declined 16% in the quarter, weighed down by weakness in Asia-Pacific countries excluding China.

Revenue climbed about 4% to $39.1 billion, beating analysts' estimates of $38.37 billion.

Looking ahead, GM Chief Financial Officer Dan Ammann said he expects improved performance in the second half of the year, boosted by GM's line of redesigned pickup trucks and other new car models.


Swiss bank Credit Suisse ( CS) reported a 33% rise in second-quarter profit on strength in its wealth management and investment banking divisions.

Credit Suisse reported net income of 1.045 billion Swiss francs ($1.11 billion) for the quarter, up from 788 million francs in the same period last year.

The bank said its wealth management arm had 7.6 billion francs in net new assets and strong inflows in emerging markets.

Cost-cutting helped the company boost results as well. Credit Suisse said it cut staff by nearly 4% from a year ago and that it was on track to reduce costs by 4.4 billion francs by the end of 2015.


Google ( GOOG) introduced a competitor to the Apple ( AAPL) TV -- a device called Chromecast that will allow users to stream media from smartphones, tablets and computers.

By plugging the dongle device into a television's HDMI port, users can use their wireless home Internet to link to mobile devices. The media is then streamed from the cloud, which Google said allows for higher-quality streaming and less drainage on the mobile device's battery. Google said Chromecast will be able to stream across various operating systems, including Apple iOS and Android.

Chromecast is launching immediately in the U.S. and will cost $35.

The device follows prior attempts by Google to enter the TV market, having developed a set-top box with Sony and Google TV, neither of which were well-received.


The chatter on Main Street (a.k.a. Google, Yahoo! and other search sites) is always of interest to investors on Wall Street. Thus, each day, TheStreet compiles the stories that are trending on the Web, and highlights the news that could make stocks move.

-- Written by Brittany Umar.

Brittany joined TheStreet.com TV in November 2006 after completing a degree in Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers College. Previously, Brittany interned at the local ABC affiliate in New York City WABC-TV 7 where she helped research and produce On Your Side, a popular consumer advocacy segment.

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