BC-US--Business Features Digest, US

The business news enterprise package planned through July 16. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

Eds: Adds FORD'S CHINA JOURNEY, sent Tuesday; GAS DRILLING-AMISH, sent Tuesday; SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK, will be sent Wednesday for use anytime; ON THE MONEY-USED CARS, will be sent Wednesday for use anytime; DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-SONY XPERIA PHONE, will be sent Wednesday for use anytime.

FORD'S CHINA JOURNEY

CHONGQING, China â¿¿ Dave Schoch has one of the toughest jobs at Ford Motor Co.: Catching the competition in the world's biggest car market. When Schoch first arrived in China 13 years ago, bicycles and pedestrians still filled the streets. Now, its eight-lane freeways are crowded with cars â¿¿ but few of them are Fords. After years of delay, Ford is finally trying to catch up to its rivals in China, investing billions in new factories and vehicles. As Ford's new head of Asia Pacific operations, Schoch is overseeing that effort and trying to make sure that Ford gets on Chinese buyers' shopping lists. By Auto Writer Dee-Ann Durbin.

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AP photos.

With:

â¿¿ CHINA-FORD'S JOURNEY-GLANCE

â¿¿ CHINA-FORD'S JOURNEY-SUMMARY BOX

DEATH OF THE PHONE LINE

MANTOLOKING, N.J. â¿¿ Robert Post misses his phone line. Post, 85, has a pacemaker that needs to be checked once a month by phone. But the copper wiring that once connected his home to the rest of the world is gone, and the phone company refuses to restore it. The traditional copper wire phone line, which began commercial service in 1877, is going dead. The number of U.S. phone lines peaked at 186 million in 2000. Since then, more than 100 million copper lines have been disconnected. The lines have been supplanted by cellphones and Internet-based phone service offered by way of cable and fiber optic wiring. Experts estimate that just one in four U.S. households will have a copper phone line by the end of this year. For most people, the phone line's demise will have little impact. But regulators and consumer advocates are increasingly concerned about the holdouts, most of whom will soon have their lines taken away. By Peter Svensson.

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AP photos, video.

GAS DRILLING-AMISH

BALTIC, Ohio â¿¿ In parts of Ohio and Pennsylvania where horse-drawn buggies clip-clop at the pace of a bygone era, Amish communities are debating a new temptation: the large amounts of cash that can come with oil and gas hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. In some ways, the Amish attitudes toward fracking are as different from the outside world as their clothes and traditions. Instead of worries about air and water pollution, they're thinking about people's souls. Says one adherent: "Amish are no different than anybody else. The power of big money can bring spiritual corruption." By Julie Carr Smyth and Kevin Begos.

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AP photos.

COLUMNS

SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK

NEW YORK â¿¿ For many small business owners, the golden years aren't looking so shiny. Nearly two-thirds of small business owners say they aren't saving enough to retire. Even more say they are worried about their ability to save enough for the lifestyle they want when they do stop working. Some are trying to correct this oversight by aggressively by putting money aside, others are taking a big risk -- planning to sell their companies one day and use the proceeds to fund their retirement. By Business Writer Joyce M. Rosenberg.

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AP photo.

ON THE MONEY-USED CARS

DETROIT â¿¿ Used car prices have come down, and they're expected to decline steadily through the rest of this year. Here's where some of the best deals can be found. By Auto Writer Dee-Ann Durbin.

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DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-SONY XPERIA PHONE

NEW YORK â¿¿ Think of a leading phone maker, and Apple and Samsung might come to mind. You might even think of HTC, maker of the well-received One phone. But you're probably not thinking Sony, a company better known for its TVs, cameras and video game machines. With the new Xperia Z phone, Sony shows it can play in the big leagues. By Anick Jesdanun.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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