Abraham, Fruchter & Twersky, LLP Announces That It Has Been Retained To File A Class Action Lawsuit Against Linn Energy, LLC

Abraham, Fruchter & Twersky, LLP has been retained to file a class action lawsuit on behalf of purchasers of Linn Energy LLC (“Linn” or the “Company”)(NASDAQ: LINE) common stock concerning possible violations of federal securities laws. Linn is an independent oil and natural gas company that engages in the acquisition and development of oil and natural gas properties.

On July 1, 2013, Linn disclosed that the Securities and Exchange Commission commenced an investigation in connection with the Company’s hedging strategies, use of non-GAAP financial measures, and their proposed acquisition of Berry Petroleum Company. Upon this news, shares of Linn stock fell from a close of $33.29 per share on July 1, 2013, to a close of $27.05 the following day, on abnormally heavy trading volume.

If you own common shares of Linn and would like to discuss this action, or if you have any questions concerning your legal rights as a potential plaintiff, please contact: Jack Fruchter or Arthur J. Chen of Abraham, Fruchter & Twersky, LLP toll free at (800) 440-8986, or via e-mail at info@aftlaw.com or achen@aftlaw.com.

Abraham, Fruchter & Twersky, LLP has extensive experience in securities class action cases, and the firm has been ranked among the leading class action law firms in terms of recoveries achieved by a survey of class action law firms conducted by Institutional Shareholder Services.

Attorney Advertising. Prior Results Do Not Guarantee A Similar Outcome.

Copyright Business Wire 2010

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