Consider it a red flag if you are far along into the interview process and you have not met your prospective supervisor. It may mean he or she is too busy to have the time to supervise and mentor you, or it could mean he or she doesn't give a favorable first impression.

4. What are the key goals for the new hire for this position immediately? In the long term?

It's always good to know what's expected so you can hit the ground running. The answer to this question should provide insights regarding skills necessary to do the job, which is great fodder for thank you notes after the interview. You may also learn if the position represents a shift in the company's strategy or if it's "business as usual" and that you'd be expected to follow the path already created.

5. A question that indicates you've done research prior to the interview.

Always ask a question that gives you a chance to feature your research about the organization. This makes it clear to the interviewer that you are serious about the job, and it may give you a leg up on all the candidates who just showed up without any planning or research. For example, "I was reading your recent press releases, and I noticed you're launching a lot of products geared toward Generation Y. Is this a strategy you anticipate continuing in the future?" A follow-up response could elaborate on why you are well qualified to address that target market.

6. Tell me about your experiences here?

It's always a good idea to encourage your interviewer to talk about him or herself. Most people enjoy the opportunity to share their own stories, and if you are a good listener, you can leave the interviewer with a positive feeling about you. On the other hand, make sure you don't start yawning if the stories go on a little too long!

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