Please see TheStreet's earnings coverage for full details of the company's record first-quarter results.

Declines in credit costs and other expenses more than offset Wells Fargo's mortgage revenue decline. Noninterest expense declined to $12.4 billion in the first quarter from $12.9 billion the previous quarter and $13.0 billion a year earlier. The company said the sequential improvement was "primarily due to lower operating losses associated with the Independent Foreclosure Review settlement and a $250 million charitable contribution to the Wells Fargo Foundation in the fourth quarter."

While many sell-side analysts raised earnings estimates and price targets for Wells Fargo following the earnings announcement on April 12, Atlantic Equities analyst Richard Staite said in a note to clients on April 15 that Wells Fargo's gain-on-sale margin for mortgage loans during the first quarter held up at 2.56% because "WFC's margins tend to lag peers by one quarter."

Wells Fargo's margins lag the industry by a quarter because the company recognizes loan sales when they actually occur, rather than when the new mortgage loan has its rate "locked," as most other large banks do.

According to Staite, Wells Fargo's decline in first-quarter mortgage revenue "was due to lower volumes with WFC seeing a fall in correspondent origination which could be due to more competitive pressure."

"Beyond Q2 we expect mortgage revenues to further decline due to lower refinancing volume across the industry," Staite wrote. The analyst expects Wells Fargo's "underlying revenues to decline by about 3% in Q2," and estimates the company will earn $3.74 a share this year, with earnings declining slightly to $3.73 in 2014. Staite has a "neutral" rating on Wells Fargo's shares.

Franklyn Codel, Wells Fargo's head of mortgage production, participated in an industry forum hosted by Citigroup earlier this week. According to a summary of the forum provided to clients by Citigroup analyst Keith Horowitz, Codel is confident that the nature of Wells Fargo's business model is ideal even during a time of declining demand.

Paraphrasing Codel, Horowitz wrote that "WFC has a natural offset in falling commission expense as the sales staff is 100% commission-based . . . and he meets with his management team every 3 weeks to review potential staff and location reductions so that WFC is prepared to act quickly as volumes change."

While that certainly presents quite a challenge to the mortgage lending staff, it is a great thing for the bottom line, since three weeks is a very quick reaction to changes in mortgage loan demand.

Codel also said that there are other offsets that can mitigate declines in mortgage loan origination volume, including higher interest rates on loans held for sale, and "other WFC business levered to rising rates, such as community banking," according to Horowitz.

WFC Chart WFC data by YCharts

Interested in more on Wells Fargo? See TheStreet Ratings' report card for this stock.

-- Written by Philip van Doorn in Jupiter, Fla.

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Philip W. van Doorn is a member of TheStreet's banking and finance team, commenting on industry and regulatory trends. He previously served as the senior analyst for TheStreet.com Ratings, responsible for assigning financial strength ratings to banks and savings and loan institutions. Mr. van Doorn previously served as a loan operations officer at Riverside National Bank in Fort Pierce, Fla., and as a credit analyst at the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York, where he monitored banks in New York, New Jersey and Puerto Rico. Mr. van Doorn has additional experience in the mutual fund and computer software industries. He holds a bachelor of science in business administration from Long Island University.

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