Home Prices in March Rise by 10.5%: Ahead of the Ticker

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- A report by CoreLogic ( CLGX) said home prices in March rose by 10.5%, the biggest year-over-year increase in seven years.

Not only does it mark the biggest annual increase since 2006, but it also makes the 13th consecutive month of home price gains.

CoreLogic attributed the increase in home prices to higher demand for homes and a limited supply of them. The market researcher said excluding distressed sales, which include homes in danger of foreclosure and short sales, home prices climbed 10.7% during the period.

The top five states with the largest increase in home prices were Nevada, California, Arizona, Idaho and Oregon.

Looking ahead, CoreLogic said it expects prices to continue to grow in April but at a slower pace. It predicts prices will rise 1.3% into April, which would be a 9.6% annual increase.


HSBC ( HBC) reported first-quarter profit that beat expectations on a drop in bad debt charges and cost-cutting efforts.

Europe's largest bank reported a pretax profit of $8.43 billion, up from $4.32 billion in the year-earlier period. Analysts, on average, expected profit of $8.1 billion.

Bad debt provisions fell by half to $1.2 billion -- the lowest quarterly level since prior to the financial crisis -- and costs in the quarter decreased 10% from the same period a year ago. HSBC has focused on reducing costs by cutting jobs and shedding businesses. The company says it is now saving $4 billion per year on an annualized basis, beating its own target of $3.5 billion.

CEO Stuart Gulliver said the bank still expects the eurozone economy to contract this year and the U.K.'s economic growth will continue to be lethargic.


YouTube may be getting ready to announce plans for paid subscriptions to be offered on the Web site.

YouTube told the Financial Times, "We have nothing to announce at this time, but we're looking into creating a subscription platform that could bring even more great content to YouTube for our users to enjoy and provide our creators with another vehicle to generate revenue from their content, beyond the rental and ad-supported models we offer."

According to the newspaper, the video sharing site, which is owned by Google ( GOOG), is planning to announce a new capability for some channels to charge a monthly subscription to access their videos. Some of the channels will reportedly cost $1.99 a month. Most videos on the Web site are expected to remain free.

The Financial Times reported that YouTube is expected to make the announcement as early as this week.

YouTube has not commented on the specifics of the subscription plan.


The chatter on Main Street (a.k.a. Google, Yahoo! and other search sites) is always of interest to investors on Wall Street. Thus, each day, TheStreet compiles the stories that are trending on the Web, and highlights the news that could make stocks move.

-- Written by Brittany Umar.

Brittany joined TheStreet.com TV in November 2006 after completing a degree in Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers College. Previously, Brittany interned at the local ABC affiliate in New York City WABC-TV 7 where she helped research and produce On Your Side, a popular consumer advocacy segment.

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