BC-US--Business Features Digest, US

The business news enterprise package planned through April 2. For comments or questions, call Joseph Pisani at 212-621-1975. For questions about photos, call ext. 1900. For questions about graphics, call ext. 7636. Repeats of stories are available from http://apexchange.com or the Service Desk, 1-800-838-4616.

Eds: Adds WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD; FOOD AND FARM-AMERICAN EDAMAME; EVERYDAY DRONES; CRISIS TEXT HOTLINES; CYPRUS-LESSONS FROM 1974

WALL STREET WEEK AHEAD

NEW YORK â¿¿ The dollar is rising again. After a sharp drop last fall, the dollar has risen almost 5 percent against other currencies over the last two months, reaching its highest level since August. The main reason is the stronger U.S. economy, coupled with relative weakness in the dollar's two global rivals, the euro and the Japanese yen. The stronger dollar is hurting U.S. companies, but not equally. Those who depend most on overseas sales, like technology companies or makers of basic goods like copper and aluminum are feeling the greatest impact. In the long run, a stronger dollar could be good for U.S. businesses by keeping inflation down. Experts predict the dollar could strengthen even more over the next year or two. Here's what to look out for. By Markets Writer Steve Rothwell.

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POWER SCOOTERS-FRAUD

WASHINGTON â¿¿ TV ads show smiling seniors enjoying an "active" lifestyle on a motorized scooter, taking in the sites at the Grand Canyon, fishing on a pier and high-fiving their grandchildren at a baseball game. The ads, which promise freedom and independence to people with limited mobility, have driven the nearly $1 billion U.S. market for scooters. But the spots also have drawn scrutiny from doctors and lawmakers, who say they create the false impression that scooters are a convenient means of transportation rather than a medical necessity. By Health Writer Matthew Perrone.

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AP photos.

EVERYDAY DRONES

WASHINGTON â¿¿ It's a good bet that aerial drones will one day be part of Americans' everyday lives, performing countless useful functions. They're a stark departure from the killing machines whose missiles incinerate terrorists. But industry officials say the civilian unmanned aircraft industry is in danger of being grounded before it can take off, in part because of an emerging public backlash based on fears the technology will be misused. Delays in issuing government safety regulations for drones are also hindering the industry. By Joan Lowy.

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AP photos, video

MEGA VERTICAL FARM

BEDFORD PARK, Ill. â¿¿ Farming in abandoned warehouses has become a hot trend in the Midwest, with varying degrees of success, as more entrepreneurs worldwide are experimenting with indoor growing systems in an attempt to grow more food locally. Now one facility, FarmedHere in suburban Chicago, is attempting to take indoor warehouse farming to the "mega farm" level, in a region of the country known more for its massive hog, corn and soybean farms than for crops of boutique greens. Here's a run-down on the trend, this farm â¿¿ and the challenges it and other indoor farms face. By Martha Irvine.

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AP photos, video

FOOD AND FARM-AMERICAN EDAMAME

MULBERRY, Ark. â¿¿ A small but growing number of farmers are experimenting with an edible soybean as they look to capitalize on Americans' interest in adding non-meat proteins to their diets. The U.S. is one of the world's top soybean producers, but most beans grown here are used to make cooking oil and feed farm animals. They aren't eaten whole. Now, some farmers from Arkansas to Minnesota have started planting a type of soybean called edamame, a common ingredient in Asian foods and can be used in everything from salads to stir frys. By Jeannie Nuss.

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AP photos.

FADING IDOL

LOS ANGELES â¿¿ In the heyday of "American Idol," the notion that it could fall ratings victim to a zombie slugfest or standard crime drama would have been laughable. That was then. Fox's singing contest, now in its 12th season, has shed about 20 percent of its audience so far to hit new lows, and has been leapfrogged repeatedly in total viewers by procedurals such as "Person of Interest" and "NCIS." Nevertheless, "American Idol" has retained its status as TV's advertising leader among series and the loyalty of its biggest backers, including Ford and Coca-Cola. By Lynn Elber.

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AP photos.

NOLAN BUSHNELL-FINDING THE NEXT STEVE JOBS

SAN FRANCISCO â¿¿ Nolan Bushnell never appeared in Apple's "think different" ads, even though the company was riffing on an iconoclastic philosophy that he embraced while running video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s. Atari's refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one reason Jobs started working for Bushnell in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. In a new book, Bushnell writes about the unorthodox thinking that fosters the breakthroughs that became Jobs' hallmark as the co-founder and CEO of Apple. By Technology Writer Michael Liedtke.

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AP photos.

LEGALIZING MARIJUANA-BARS

TACOMA, Wash. â¿¿ John Connelly leans forward on his barstool, set his lips against a clear glass pipe and inhales a white cloud of marijuana vapor. A handful of people mill around him while three young women stand behind the bar, ready to assist with the preparation of the bongs, as the strains of a blues band playing downstairs sounded faintly off the exposed brick walls. Welcome to the Stonegate. It's one of a tiny number of bars, cafes and private clubs catering to the stoner class in Washington and Colorado since voters last fall made them the first states to legalize marijuana for adults over 21. By Gene Johnson.

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AP photos.

GAMES-GAME DEVELOPERS CONFERENCE

LOS ANGELES â¿¿ It's a time of transition for the video game industry. With last year's launch of the Wii U, the impending arrival of the PlayStation 4 and the likelihood of a new Xbox on the horizon, the next generation of video game consoles is nearly here. However, more than half of the attendees at this week's Game Developers Conference in San Francisco identify themselves as indie developers and their next creations will be for smartphones and tablets. So when it comes to the next generation of consoles, the question on their minds doesn't seem to be "What's next?" but rather "Who cares?" By Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang.

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AP photos.

OBAMA'S IOUs-CLIMATE CHANGE

President Barack Obama showed in his first term that he doesn't need Congress to take action against climate change, but he could need Congress to take actions on the scale needed to have a significant effect curbing greenhouse gases. And that seems unlikely as Obama seeks to make good on one of his major campaign promises and biggest second term challenges. The effects of rising global temperatures are widespread and costly: more severe storms, rising seas, species extinctions, and changes in weather patterns that will alter food production and the spread of disease. By Dina Cappiello.

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CRISIS TEXT HOTLINES

NEW YORK â¿¿ They stream in a couple of dozen times a week, cries for help in bursts of text to DoSomething.org, a nonprofit more used to texting out details to teens on good causes and campaigns than receiving them from young people in crisis. "I feel like committing suicide," one text read. "What's the suicide hotline number?" Another asked: "How do you tell a friend they need to go to rehab?" DoSomething isn't a hotline, but its CEO, Nancy Lublin, decided to, well, do something. She's leading an effort to establish a 24/7 national text hotline across trigger issues for teens in the hope that it will become their 911. By Leanne Italie.

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AP photos.

CYPRUS-LESSONS FROM 1974

LONDON â¿¿ As it grapples with the prospect of years of economic pain, Cyprus will try to draw strength from its not-so-distant experience of invasion â¿¿ and the fact that a whole generation knows what it means to rebuild from scratch. But it's a tough task. Any inspiration will be badly needed on the small east Mediterranean island nation of less than a million people, as even the most optimistic forecasters predict years of recession and sky-high unemployment. By Pan Pylas.

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AP photos.

BULGARIA-BRIDAL MARKET

STARA ZAGORA, Bulgaria â¿¿ Donka Hristova lets her mother pull her skintight mini-dress a half-inch down her leg. Checking her makeup one last time, she joins her two younger sisters in a provocative dance atop a car trunk. The Gypsy girl knows she has to look her best. She is, after all, on an important life mission: catching the eye of one of the hundreds of young Gypsy guys prowling around what locals have dubbed the "bridal market" to initiate a complex ritual of haggling that could lead to marriage. By Gregory Katz.

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AP photos.

COLUMNS:

SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK

NEW YORK â¿¿ Two months after a severe flu season forced millions of workers to stay home, paid sick time is becoming an issue for small business owners. In March, the Portland and Philadelphia city councils approved sick leave laws, and two Democratic lawmakers reintroduced a bill in Congress that would make paid sick leave a federal requirement. There's a great divide over the issue â¿¿ on one side are owners who oppose it because of the financial and administrative burdens of having to pay workers when they stay home. But others believe it's a morale booster and it encourages workers to stay home instead of coming to work and infecting everyone around them. By Joyce M. Rosenberg.

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OF MUTUAL INTEREST-HIDDEN GEMS

BOSTON â¿¿ An annual scorecard of mutual fund performance is in, and it's generating more of the negative headlines that fund managers have become accustomed to in recent years. The key finding: Two-thirds of managed U.S. stock funds failed to beat the market in 2012, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices. But there is a positive takeaway for investors: Funds specializing in stocks of small foreign companies have beaten their market benchmark year after year. By Personal Finance Writer Mark Jewell.

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With:

â¿¿ HIDDEN GEMS-GLANCE

DIGITAL LIFE-TECH TEST-TABLET-PC HYBRIDS

LOS ANGELES â¿¿ Since Windows 8's debut in October, there have been a range of hot-looking devices that try to combine elements of tablets and traditional PCs. These hybrids seem as if they would be great both for relaxing with an e-book and for writing stories when I occasionally need to snap back into work mode. But trying out three tablet-PC hybrids running Windows 8 has convinced me that the good old laptop still reigns for creating documents quickly and accurately. By Ryan Nakashima.

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AP photos.

ON THE MONEY-FREE TAX HELP

Free tax help is available, and it's not just for those in financial need. AARP, the nonprofit organization that advocates for people over 50, has relaxed rules about who they offer free tax preparation for and the Internal Revenue Service offers free tax advice and basic online filing, regardless of income. That said, the free options are best for taxpayers with uncomplicated finances. If you're running a small business or own investment property, you will be better off hiring a professional. Here's a look at where taxpayers can find free assistance. By Business Writer Joseph Pisani.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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