Time Warner Cable Business Class Opens Data Center In Manhattan To Help Businesses Protect Their Information Technology Assets

Time Warner Cable Business Class, a premier provider of business communications solutions, today officially opened a data center in New York City to provide businesses with a secure facility for their information technology assets. The 17,000 square-foot facility is located at 395 Hudson Street in Lower Manhattan and offers flexible space options to serve the needs of businesses of all sizes.

“Information technology is the lifeblood of any business and protecting these assets in a secure data center is a high priority in today’s business world,” said Ken Fitzpatrick, President of Time Warner Cable Business Class, East Region. “We are pleased to offer the business community this data facility to serve all their colocation needs. Our data facility gives IT managers the peace of mind that their assets are safe, accessible and available to ensure their businesses operate optimally.”

The data center is designed to meet the needs of enterprise, small-and medium-sized businesses, as well as governmental and educational entities, seeking to manage their IT infrastructure with efficiency, security and redundancy. Doing so ensures that critical data operations perform uninterrupted and at the highest level of performance.

New York State Senator Brad Hoylman said, “As the State Senator representing the heart of New York City's rapidly-expanding tech sector, I'm proud to welcome this Time Warner Cable Business Class data center to my district. Access to secure data centers is increasingly important for large and small businesses, and I think Time Warner Cable’s center will help serve as a catalyst for continued growth in the IT industry, which is key to our city's economic future.”

“It’s exciting that Time Warner Cable Business Class recognizes the need for more secure data center space in New York City and has built this impressive colocation facility,” said Erik Grimmelmann, Executive Director of the New York Technology Council (NYTECH), a non-profit industry association dedicated to the furtherance of the technology industry in New York. “Not only is technology an important and rapidly growing sector in New York’s economy, but it is also an essential component of the businesses in all sectors.”

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