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TOP STORIES:

SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK

NEW YORK â¿¿ Two months after a severe flu season forced millions of workers to stay home, paid sick time is becoming an issue for small business owners. In March, the Portland and Philadelphia city councils approved sick leave laws, and two Democratic lawmakers reintroduced a bill in Congress that would make paid sick leave a federal requirement. There's a great divide over the issue â¿¿ on one side are owners who oppose it because of the financial and administrative burdens of having to pay workers when they stay home. But others believe it's a morale booster and it encourages workers to stay home instead of coming to work and infecting everyone around them. By Joyce M. Rosenberg.

MARKETS & ECONOMY:

PENDING HOME SALES

WASHINGTON ⿿ The National Association of Realtors reports on a measure of the number of Americans who signed contracts to buy homes in February. In January, pending home sales rose to the highest level in more than 2½ years. The gains show buyers are growing more confident in the housing recovery. By Martin Crustinger.

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TECHNOLOGY & MEDIA:

NOLAN BUSHNELL-FINDING THE NEXT STEVE JOBS

SAN FRANCISCO â¿¿ Nolan Bushnell never appeared in Apple's "think different" ads, even though the company was riffing on an iconoclastic philosophy that he embraced while running video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s. Atari's refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one reason Jobs started working for Bushnell in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old in 1974. In a new book, Bushnell writes about the unorthodox thinking that fosters the breakthroughs that became Jobs' hallmark as the co-founder and CEO of Apple. By Technology Writer Michael Liedtke.

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