In total, Starbucks has invested more than $70 million in collaborative farmer programs and activities over the past 40 years, which include C.A.F.E. practices, farmer support centers, farmer loans and forest carbon projects. All of these integrated programs directly support improving farmer livelihoods and a long-term supply of high-quality coffee for the industry. This new facility will build on and globally scale the work currently happening at five farmer support centers worldwide in Rwanda, Tanzania, Colombia, China – as well as Starbucks first farmer support center which opened in San Jose, Costa Rica in 2004.

Starbucks farmer support centers are home to agronomists and quality experts working directly with farmers to provide support in growing high-quality arabica coffee. By providing farmers with expertise and training in soil management, field-crop production and milling processes, these practices can improve the quality and size of the harvest. The varied elevation of the farm will allow the agronomists to test responsible growing practices while ensuring robust biological diversity. The research discoveries and best practices from this work will inform growing principles for farmers around the world.

“The convergence of climate change and ecosystem deterioration creates stress on the ability of farmers to produce crops. The work of Starbucks over the last several years to address many of these issues facing coffee producers - including the environmental, economic and social development of coffee production - is very impressive,” said Peter Seligmann, chairman and ceo of Conservation International. “The opportunity this continued investment brings will ensure the most innovative resources are brought to bear for sustainability and resilience across all farming communities.”

In 2008 Starbucks and Conservation International began conducting impact assessments of C.A.F.E. practices on coffee farmers and communities, and in 2012 aggregated the year-over-year performance impact. For example, on average farmers employing C.A.F.E. practices saw 98 percent of farms maintaining or improving soil fertility and 100 percent of school-age children on smallholder farms were able to attend school. Of the 545 million pounds of coffee purchased by Starbucks in fiscal year 2012, across 29 countries, 93 percent of it was ethically sourced.

If you liked this article you might like

The 10 Craziest Pumpkin Spice Items You Can Buy off Amazon

These Powerful Corporate Executives Could Make a Run at the Presidency in 2020

CEOs Are Dropping Like Flies

Sorry Elon Musk but Artificial Intelligence Grows Jobs: Domino's Pizza CEO

Cramer: Dominoes Are in Play Today