Andresen has served on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE); Board of Editors for Corrosion Journal; Chairman of the NACE Research Committee; Chair of the NACE Awards Committee and the Advisory Panel for the Halden Test Reactor in Norway and the Idaho National Lab Science User Facility.

To see a video with Peter Andresen discussing his work in the area of metal cracking and sharing his thoughts on being elected to the NAE, click HERE.

Robert Schafrik, general manager of the Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aviation, is recognized for his more than 40 years of innovation in materials for gas turbine engines. During this time, Schafrik and his team reduced the development time for several new materials, including low rhenium turbine blade alloy, R65 – a high temperature cast-and-wrought disk alloy, titanium aluminide turbine blade alloy and greatly expanded the use of composite applications in engines.

“It is an exciting time to be in material development for gas turbine engines,” said Schafrik, who spent 20 years on active duty as a military officer in the U.S. Air Force prior to joining GE in 1997. “The technology advances that have greatly enhanced the performance and capabilities of aircraft engines are made possible in large part by the advances in materials.”

Schafrik has a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University. He has contributed to 28 archived publications and holds 19 patents. He is currently a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the National Materials and Manufacturing Board, and is the Chair of the External Advisory Committee for the department of Materials Science and Engineering at Ohio State University.

Jan Schilling, advanced products chief engineer at GE Aviation, is recognized by the NAE for his accomplishments in advancing technology for modern turbofan engines. Schilling’s work encompasses the Advanced Design Demonstrators QCSEE and E 3 to the introduction of the CFM56-3, CF6-80A, CFM56-7 and the design and flawless entry into service of the GE90-115B engine, which is the world’s highest thrust engine. He currently has 53 patents filed, with several more that are pending.

“Being elected to the National Academy of Engineering is a tremendous honor,” said Schilling, who will celebrate his 44 year at GE Aviation in June. “The modern turbofan engine has evolved over my career at GE Aviation, and I am proud to continue to play a role in the technology evolution that makes our engines more fuel efficient and durable.”

If you liked this article you might like

GE Is 'One of the Toughest Stocks I've Ever Had to Deal With,' Jim Cramer Says

General Electric's New CEO Has One Easy Choice

Here Are Monday's Hottest Stocks as the Dow Reaches New Records

You Are Forgetting This Commonsense Investing Wisdom

GE Is Too Cheap to Sell, but Its Dividend Looks Too Shaky to Buy: Cramer