Peter Andresen, Principal Scientist, GE Global Research (Photo: Business Wire)

GE (NYSE: GE) today announced that three distinguished engineers, one from the company’s Global Research Center, and two from its Aviation business, have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering.
Peter Andresen, Principal Scientist, GE Global Research (Photo: Business Wire)

Peter Andresen, Principal Scientist, GE Global Research (Photo: Business Wire)

“GE has been innovating for more than 100 years, and this is further proof that we’re still at the top of our game,” said Mark Little, GE’s Chief Technology Officer. “These three individuals represent some of the best minds and brightest talent that we have across our company and I congratulate them all on this prestigious honor.”

Peter Andresen, a Principal Scientist at GE Global Research, is a new inductee into the NAE in recognition of his more than three decades of work in the area of stress cracking prediction and prevention. “This is one of the highest honors of my professional life,” said Andresen, a materials scientist, who began his career with GE Global Research in 1978 after earning a Ph.D. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “My father was an engineer and I always pestered those around me to understand how things worked. The blend of sophisticated experimental measurements, underlying science, and technical intuition makes the work endlessly fascinating.”

Andresen holds 26 patents and is GE’s most prolific researcher. Over the course of his 35 year career at GE Global Research, he has authored more than 450 publications – more than any other GE researcher. His research addresses the very slow growth of cracks in the hot water environments common to nuclear, steam turbine, and geothermal energy systems. Much of his work has focused on detecting, quantifying, and predicting the growth of cracks on stainless steels, which are nominally thought of as resistant to corrosion, but when battered by high temperature and pressure water and steam, can be very susceptible to "stress corrosion cracking."

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