Slovenia has faced a series of street protests against austerity and corruption since December as unemployment hit a 14-year high at about 13 percent, and living standards plunged because of the government's spending cuts.

"At this moment, many Slovenes think there is no solution," said Bratusek, who heads the center-left Positive Slovenia party. "I say, there is a solution."

Jansa, a veteran politician who also led the government between 2004 and 2008, praised his austerity program and denied the corruption allegations, saying they were politically motivated to weaken his administration.

He warned the nation of 2 million could face bankruptcy after his unseating.

"Greece is slowly turning to recovery," Jansa said. "I would be happy to say the same for Slovenia."

The Alpine nation's economy is expected to shrink by a further 2 percent this year after dropping by about 2.5 percent in 2012 â¿¿ the most in the EU after Greece and Cyprus due to weakening investment and faltering domestic consumption.

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