“We have obviously benefited from our financial leverage during what appears to be the early stages of the housing market recovery. But, our focus remains on reducing leverage and we have made tremendous progress in de-risking the business by improving our balance sheet, including the recent equity raise and the acquisition of Kleer. Since June 30, 2011, we have improved our Net Debt to Adjusted EBITDA ratio from 6.7 to 4.7 at the end of the current quarter.”

Discussion of EBITDA

Headwaters has historically defined EBITDA as net income plus net interest expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation, and goodwill and other impairments. Any additional adjustments to EBITDA are detailed in the table that follows. EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are used by management to measure operating performance, as a supplement to our consolidated financial statements presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are also used by investors to measure a company’s ability to service its debt and meet its other cash needs. The EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA calculations as reflected in the following tables are consistent with the definitions Headwaters has used historically and with the definitions management intends on using in future periods when measuring operating performance.

Management believes EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are helpful in highlighting trends, because EBITDA excludes certain results of decisions that are outside the control of operating management and can differ significantly from company to company depending on long-term strategic decisions regarding capital structure, tax jurisdictions, and capital investments. Management compensates for the limitations of using non-GAAP financial measures by using them to supplement GAAP results to provide a more complete understanding of the factors and trends affecting the business rather than by using GAAP results alone.

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not measurements of our financial performance under GAAP and should not be considered as alternatives to net income, operating income or any other performance measure derived in accordance with GAAP or as a measure of our liquidity. Additionally, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not intended to be measures of free cash flow available for management’s discretionary use, as they do not consider certain cash requirements such as interest payments, tax payments and debt service requirements. Our presentation of EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and should not be considered in isolation, or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Because the definition of EBITDA varies among companies and industries, our definition of EBITDA may not be comparable to other similarly-titled measures used by other companies.

If you liked this article you might like

S&P 500, Dow and Nasdaq Post New Records as Crude Rallies

Wall Street on Track for Across-the-Board Records as Crude Rallies

How to Trade These Most Active Stocks -- LifeLock, Tyson Foods and More

Midday Report: 3M Drags on Dow After Downgrade; Crude Surges to Boost S&P 500

Stocks Trade Near Records as Crude Oil Surge Plateaus