Noninterest Income

Noninterest income for the year ended December 31, 2012 was $87.3 million, up 8.7% or $7.0 million, compared with $80.3 million for the same period in 2011. Insurance and other financial services revenue increased approximately $1.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the year ended December 31, 2011. This increase was due primarily to the acquisition of an insurance agency during the second quarter of 2011 as well as organic growth in commercial product lines. Retirement plan administration fees increased approximately $1.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the year ended December 31, 2011, due primarily to an increase in customer base. ATM and debit card fees increased approximately $0.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to the year ended December 31, 2011, due primarily to an increase in card usage and customer base. Other noninterest income increased approximately $6.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to December 31, 2011. This increase was due in part to a $1.1 million payoff gain on a purchased commercial real estate loan. In addition, the Company recognized nonrecurring items totaling approximately $1.4 million during 2012 including a prepayment penalty fee related to a previously disclosed loss of a retirement plan client and flood related recoveries.  Further, mortgage banking revenue increased approximately $2.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as compared to the same period in 2011 as the Company sold certain residential mortgages as market conditions warranted. The Company sold approximately $64.6 million residential mortgages during 2012, as compared to approximately $17.5 million sales during 2011, while also experiencing more favorable gains during 2012. The Company also realized net securities gains of approximately $0.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2012, as compared to $0.2 million for the same period in 2011.  These increases were partially offset by a decrease in service charges on deposit accounts of approximately $3.2 million, or 15.1%, for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared with the same period in 2011 primarily due to a decrease in overdraft fee income.

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