The City & County Of San Francisco And Citi Community Development Receive 2013 Excellence Award In Public-Private Partnerships From U.S. Conference Of Mayors

The City and County of San Francisco and Citi Community Development today received the 2013 Excellence Award for Public-Private Partnerships at the U.S. Conference of Mayors 81st Winter Meeting in Washington, DC. The award, which honors the outstanding achievements made possible through the combined effort of cities and members of the Mayors Business Council, recognizes the cross-sector collaboration on Kindergarten to College, the nation’s first universal college savings program for children.

First launched in 2010, Kindergarten to College automatically establishes savings accounts in Citibank branches for children entering kindergarten in all 75 of the San Francisco Unified School District’s elementary schools. All accounts are seeded with an initial $50 deposit by the City of San Francisco, and children receiving free and reduced price lunches receive an additional $50.

“I thank Citi Community Development, San Francisco Unified School District, Mayor Lee, and all our partners who have worked to make K2C a success,” said Treasurer José Cisneros. “Research tells us that a child with a college savings account in their name is several times more likely to go to college, and we are cultivating expectations for academic success for our students.”

Kindergarten to College is designed to embed a savings culture among San Francisco’s children and their parents as a way to expand college access and increase college completion rates while decreasing debt. Since its inception, nearly 8,000 accounts have been opened, with the City of San Francisco matching additional contributions dollar-for-dollar up to $100 in the first year. Thereafter, families may make yearly contributions of up to $2,500. To facilitate the program, Citibank created a platform through which accounts are opened and managed electronically.

“Kindergarten to College is an integrated approach to building assets and making higher education attainable through a universal student savings account program,” said Bob Annibale, Citi’s Global Director of Microfinance and Community Development. “Citi is proud that other cities are recognizing our work with the City and County of San Francisco as a national model for expanding financial inclusion and access to higher education, both of which are key drivers for economic opportunity.”

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