Business Highlights

By The Associated Press

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Boeing: 787 production continues as planned

Boeing said 787s will keep rolling off the assembly line while it works to get the planes that were grounded by regulators flying again.

Boeing's newest, flashiest jet was grounded worldwide on Thursday after one plane suffered a battery fire and another had an emergency landing because pilots noticed a burning smell. The two incidents prompted airlines and regulators around the world to ground the planes until a fix for the battery problem is found that satisfies the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration.

It's not clear how long the investigation â¿¿ or the fix â¿¿ will take, but it won't be cheap for Boeing. Meanwhile, airlines that had sought the prestige of flying the world's most sophisticated plane are instead stuck with one they can't use.

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Lithium batteries central to Boeing's 787 woes

WASHINGTON (AP) â¿¿ Lithium batteries that can leak corrosive fluid and start fires have emerged as the chief safety concern involving Boeing's 787 Dreamliner, a problem that apparently is far more serious than government or company officials acknowledged less than a week ago.

The Federal Aviation Administration late Wednesday grounded Boeing's newest and most technologically advanced jetliner until the risk of battery fires is resolved. That order applies only to the six Dreamliners operated by United Airlines, the lone U.S. carrier with 787s. Other airlines and civil aviation authorities in other countries quickly followed suit.

Japan's two largest air carriers voluntarily grounded their 787s on Wednesday, ahead of the FAA order, following an emergency landing by a 787 in Japan. On Thursday the European Aviation Safety Agency ordered all European carriers to ground the jetliner. The Indian government ordered Air India to ground its six Boeing 787s, and Ethiopian Airlines grounded its four 787s "for precautionary inspection."

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