A Microsoft 'Evangelist' and Former Employee Think the Company's Marketing Stinks

NEW YORK ( TheStreet) -- I can tell pretty quickly when something I write about a company resonates.

When I strike a chord, I notice an increase in company-specific lawyers viewing my LinkedIn profile; executives and public/media relations departments begin to "reach out" to "open a dialogue"; and/or I start hearing from current and former employees of companies under the microscope.

Over the last month or two, I have heard from a considerable number of current and former Best Buy ( BBY) and Microsoft ( MSFT) staffers across ranks. When these folks echo your sentiment once or twice, you don't think much about it. However, as support from past and present workforces keeps rolling in -- as independent accounts -- it's logical to think you're on to at least a little something.

The other day, a former 10-year plus Microsoft veteran sent me an email. This person's spouse still works for the company. The better half's tenure approaches a decade.

The correspondence came in response to Does Steve Ballmer Even Know Microsoft Makes Xbox?, where I question Redmond's marketing apparatus. There's simply no connection between Microsoft's best work in recent years -- Xbox -- and its larger, more entrenched Windows ecosystem.

I won't interject much because this former MSFT employee states it well. And, believe me, this person is not alone. Do some digging; you might find a similar level of bewilderment from unassociated Microsoft workers.

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