It safeguards them from a phenomenon I wrote about back in April on TheStreet.

During that time I got some stuff about AAPL right, some stuff wrong, but I was -- as I am now -- near-term bullish on the company, long-term bearish/cautious. Admittedly, today I am not quite as bullish near-term (how could you be?) and not quite as bearish long-term ( where's the competition?). That aside, here's the "warning" of sorts I issued in April:

Important Note: I wrote these words in late April when it seemed all AAPL could do is go up. Longs were throwing 1980s coke parties and snorting stock certificates off of glass coffee tables. But, since that article, AAPL is down roughly 17%.

I have seen the process take place. I have fallen victim to it. With each victory, you become all the more certain that there's no way -- God willing -- you can be defeated. A little bit of loyalty, and Tim Cook and China will take care of the rest.

Ironically, seeing profits slowly start to get smaller only strengthens your resolve. You hold. You listen to the pumps to buy on the dips. And it keeps working. You're rich. But for every disciplined investor who manages his or her position properly, there's at least one devotee who stays all-in and keeps digging himself or herself a deeper hole. Before you know it, your otherwise rational mind fooled you into staying in a position from 700 down to 250 because you just knew it had to make it to 1,000. It was destiny.

What makes the whole situation even more tragic is that it's relatively easy to manage a position like AAPL, particularly once you have built up some size. Apple is a long-term investor's dream not simply because it seems to always end up moving higher, but because it's an income-generating powerhouse.

It is what it is. Speaks for itself. And it's timestamped.

All I will add is that in addition to having a written plan when you enter the position, you're crazy if you do not write covered calls against an AAPL position of 100 shares or more. That was the case back in April and that's the case now. Always has been, always will be.

Writing covered calls on AAPL, coupled now with the dividend, is better than taking a second job you never have to show up at, yet it still pays.

And, oh, whatever you do -- don't make sweet love to a stock. Not even AAPL.

--Written by Rocco Pendola in Santa Monica, Calif.
Rocco Pendola is TheStreet's Director of Social Media. Pendola's daily contributions to TheStreet frequently appear on CNBC and at various top online properties, such as Forbes.

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