Bloggers are already abuzz about whether a new Ferrari supercar will appear next year in Detroit.

Still, Hyde says, the show is the best place to get a lot of information about cars in a global market that's become huge and fractured. More than 6,000 journalists from 70 countries will attend two days of media previews starting on Monday, giving the show a reach far beyond Detroit. That's up from just 850 journalists 25 years ago.

Nissan is one of several brands that pulled out of the Detroit show in recent years, only to return when they realized its impact. This year, Nissan is going all out, even appealing to the sense of smell in its display. It plans to pump a green tea-like fragrance into its Detroit exhibit.

The idea? To put visitors at ease. And maybe get them to part with a little green of their own.

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