Also:

TV ON THE INTERNET

NEW YORK â¿¿The Barry Diller-backed Internet company that challenged cable and satellite TV services by offering inexpensive live television online plans to expand beyond New York City this spring. In the wake of a federal court ruling that tentatively endorsed the service's legality, Aereo will bring its $8-a-month offering to Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington and 18 other markets in the U.S., as well as to New York's suburbs. For the past year, the service had been limited to New York City residents as the company fine-tuned its technology and awaited guidance on whether its unlicensed use of free, over-the-air broadcasts amounted to a copyright violation. By Anick Jesdanun.

Other highlights:

â¿¿ GADGET SHOW-ULTRAVIOLET â¿¿ In a bid to jumpstart its fledgling online entertainment system, Hollywood studios are resorting to a time-honored tactic: giving stuff away.

â¿¿ GADGET SHOW-PANASONIC-ULTRA-HD OLED TV â¿¿ Panasonic is showing off a prototype TV that combines the two hottest technologies at this year's gadget show in Las Vegas: organic light-emitting diodes and ultrahigh definition.

â¿¿ GADGET SHOW-DETAILS â¿¿ A look at some details about the CES gadget show, the biggest trade show in the Americas.

NKOREA-GOOGLE

PYONGYANG, North Korea â¿¿ Students at North Korea's premier university showed Google's executive chairman how they look for information online: they Google it. But surfing the Internet that way is the privilege of only a very few in North Korea, whose authoritarian government imposes strict limits on access to the World Wide Web. Google's Eric Schmidt got a first look at North Korea's limited Internet usage when an American delegation he and former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson are leading visited a computer lab at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang. By Jean H. Lee.

AP photos, video.

Also:

â¿¿ GOOGLE-NYC â¿¿ Google says it will offer free Wi-Fi in New York City's Chelsea neighborhood, where Google has more than 3,000 employees.

If you liked this article you might like

What's Behind the Surge in Energy Stocks

Hillary Clinton Says Prosecuting Individuals is Key to Wall Street Reform